English


Faculty List

  • K. Akiwenzie-Damm, M.A. (Ottawa), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • M. Assif, B.A. (Hassan II), M.A., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • C. Bolus-Reichert, M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor 
  • U. Chakravarty, B.A. (Columbia), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor 
  • R.M. Brown, M.A., Ph.D. (Binghamton), Professor Emeritus
  • M.C. Cuddy-Keane, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor Emerita
  • N. Dolan, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor
  • A. DuBois, B.A. (Duke), Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor
  • D. Flynn, M.A., Ph.D. (Berkeley), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • K. Gaston, A.B. (Princeton), M.Phil. (Cambridge), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Professor 
  • M.B. Goldman, M.A. (Victoria), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • S.D. King, M.A., Ph.D. (Western), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • N. ten Kortenaar, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • K.R. Larson, M.Phil., M.St. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • G. Leonard, M.A., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor
  • R. Lundy, M.A. (Saskatchewan), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • A. Maurice, M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor
  • A. Milne, M.A., Ph.D. (McMaster), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • S. Nikkila, B.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Edinburgh), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • Y. Ryzhik, Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor (CLTA) 
  • S. Sathiyaseelan, M.A. (Nebraska-Lincoln), Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • S. Saljoughi, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Ryerson), M.A. (Ryerson), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor
  • D. Tysdal, B.A. (Regina), M.A. (Acadia), M.A. (Toronto), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • K. Vernon, B.A., M.A. (Simon Fraser), Ph.D. (Victoria), Associate Professor
  • L. Wey, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • A. Westoll, B.Sc. (Queens), M.F.A. (UBC), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream


Chair: N. ten Kortenaar: engchair.utsc@utoronto.ca

The discipline of English at UTSC offers programs in literature, creative writing, and film. Students of literature explore the rich variety of texts (including fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, but also the graphic novel or the narrative video game) in courses that range across centuries and across the globe. Film courses examine films, also across historical and cultural contexts. Creative writing students learn to express themselves in genres ranging from fiction to non-fiction, poetry, and screenplays. Our curriculum encourages students to think and write critically about the development and significance of the forms that writers and filmmakers work in, which are ways of seeing and expressing experience, and about the relationship between art and the world. The English programs at UTSC give students the tools to engage with the ways people have thought about, written about, and seen the world around them and, in so doing, to act in our own time through critical language and argument.

  • A-level courses introduce students to the study of English and Creative Writing at the university level.
  • B-level courses have no prerequisites and are available both to beginners and to more advanced students.
  • C-level courses are designed to build upon previous work. While they are open to all upper-level students, they presuppose some background in critical skills.
  • D-level courses provide opportunities for more sophisticated studies and require some independent work on the part of the student. These courses are generally restricted in enrolment and focus on seminar discussions.

Students are advised to check the prerequisites for C- and D-level courses when planning their individual programs, and to consult with the Program Supervisor before taking courses on other campuses.

Students planning to pursue graduate studies in English are advised to include ENGC15H3 within their program (it is required for the English Specialist) and to consider enrolling in ENGD98Y3, an intensive capstone seminar that provides qualified students with the opportunity to develop a senior essay project under the supervision of a faculty member in English. The Program Supervisor is available by appointment to advise students selecting courses with graduate study in mind.

Combined Degree Programs, Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
The Combined Degree Programs for UTSC Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) with the Master of Teaching (MT) offered by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education provide students with a direct pathway to the completion, in 6 years, of their Undergraduate degree, Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications, and Master’s degree.​ These Combined Degree Programs allow students to complete 1.0 credit in courses that may be counted towards both degrees.

The Combined Degree Programs options are:

  • English (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

English (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Program Combination Restrictions:
a. The Specialist and Major programs in English and Minor program in English Literature may not be combined.
b. The Major and Minor programs in Creative Writing may not be combined.
c. Students may combine one of the programs in English (Specialist or Major or Minor in English Literature) with one of the programs in Creative Writing (Major or Minor) and/or the Minor in Literature and Film Studies. Students are cautioned that there can be a maximum overlap of 1.5 credits in ENG courses taken to complete their selected programs. The possible combinations are:
     i. The Specialist in English with the Minor in Creative Writing OR the Minor in Literature and Film Studies;
     ii. The Major in English with the Major in Creative Writing;
     iii. The Major in English with the Minor in Creative Writing and/or the Minor in Literature and Film Studies;
     iv. The Major in Creative Writing with the Minor in English Literature and/or the Minor in Literature and Film Studies.

For more information, including Admission and Program requirements, see the Combined Degree Programs section of the Calendar.​

Guidelines for first-year course selection
ENGA01H3 and ENGA02H3 introduce students to the study of literature at the university level and are part of the core requirements for the English Specialist, Major, and Minor.
ENGA03H3 introduces students to the craft of creative writing and is required for admission to the Creative Writing programs. ENGA10H3 and/or ENGA11H3 provide another valuable entry point to introductory work in literary studies and are part of the core requirements for the Minor in Literature and Film Studies. All of these courses are also open to students with a general interest in English. First-year students are welcome to begin taking B-level classes alongside their introductory courses.

English Courses
The following categories offer a broad orientation to English as a discipline and suggest some of our department’s core areas of strength. They can be a guide for selecting related courses as students move through the program. They also highlight some of the possible routes and threads students can follow as they develop particular areas of interest.   

Students should keep in mind that these categories are not mutually exclusive and that an important aspect of studying English literature involves thinking critically about the construction of historical and thematic boundaries. Students are also encouraged to develop thematic routes and threads through the program that reflect their individual areas of interest. Faculty members are available for individual consultation to discuss possibilities.

Medieval Literature
ENGB27H3ENGB31H3ENGB39H3ENGC29H3ENGC30H3ENGC40H3ENGD29H3ENGD30H3 

Early Modern (Renaissance) Literature
ENGB27H3, ENGB32H3ENGB33H3, ENGC10H3ENGC33H3, ENGC34H3, ENGC35H3, ENGD14H3, ENGD19H3 

Long 18th-Century British Literature  
ENGB28H3ENGC36H3, ENGC37H3ENGC38H3ENGC39H3ENGC69H3ENGD18H3 

Long 19th-Century British Literature (Includes Romantic and Victorian)
ENGB28H3, ENGC21H3, ENGC22H3ENGC25H3ENGC42H3ENGC43H3, ENGC69H3ENGD43H3ENGD48H3ENGD89H3 

Modernism, Modernity, and Postmodernity
ENGA10H3ENGA11H3, ENGB14H3ENGB28H3ENGB75H3ENGB76H3, ENGC47H3ENGC80H3ENGD07H3ENGD13H3ENGD42H3, ENGD91H3 

Canadian Literature
ENGB06H3ENGB07H3ENGB25H3ENGC01H3ENGC02H3ENGC03H3ENGC07H3ENGC09H3ENGC14H3ENGC70H3ENGC71H3ENGD05H3ENGD57H3ENGD58H3ENGD80H3ENGD84H3 

American Literature
ENGB08H3, ENGB09H3, ENGC12H3ENGC13H3ENGC50H3ENGC70H3, ENGC71H3ENGC91H3ENGD59H3ENGD60H3  

Postcolonial, Diasporic, and World Literatures
ENGB17H3ENGB19H3ENGB22H3ENGC51H3ENGC59H3ENGC70H3ENGC71H3ENGC83H3ENGC84H3ENGD08H3ENGD62H3ENGD71H3ENGD96H3 

Form and Genre
ENGA01H3ENGB04H3ENGB12H3ENGB14H3ENGB30H3ENGB31H3ENGB34H3ENGB35H3ENGB70H3ENGC23H3ENGC24H3ENGC26H3ENGC27H3ENGC28H3ENGC38H3ENGC41H3ENGC48H3ENGC47H3ENGC54H3ENGC69H3ENGC78H3ENGC80H3ENGC90H3ENGD07H3ENGD12H3ENGD13H3ENGD94H3 

Aspects of Theory
ENGB50H3, ENGC15H3, ENGC45H3, ENGC54H3, ENGC59H3, (ENGC76H3), ENGC82H3, ENGD03H3, ENGD19H3, ENGD55H3, ENGD93H3, ENGD98Y3

Literature, Culture, and the Other Arts
ENGA10H3ENGA11H3ENGB37H3ENGB38H3ENGB50H3ENGC04H3ENGC05H3ENGC06H3ENGC11H3ENGC23H3ENGC41H3ENGC43H3ENGC54H3ENGC56H3ENGC76H3, ENGC78H3, ENGC79H3, ENGC89H3, ENGD13H3, ENGD50H3ENGD54H3, ENGD68H3 

Creative Writing
ENGB60H3ENGB61H3ENGB63H3ENGC04H3ENGC05H3ENGC06H3ENGC08H3ENGC24H3ENGC86H3ENGC87H3ENGC88H3ENGD22H3ENGD26Y3ENGD27Y3ENGD28Y3 

Literature and Film Studies
ENGB70H3ENGB71H3ENGB74H3ENGB75H3ENGB76H3ENGC56H3ENGC75H3ENGC78H3ENGC82H3ENGC83H3ENGC84H3ENGC92H3ENGD52H3ENGD62H3ENGD91H3ENGD93H3ENGD94H3, ENGD96H3  

Experiential Learning and Outreach
For a community-based experiential learning opportunity in your academic field of interest, consider the course CTLB03H3, which can be found in the Teaching and Learning section of the Calendar.