Anthropology

Faculty List

  • S. Bamford, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (McMaster), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor
  • W. Butt, B.A. (John Hopkins University), Ph.D. (California, San Diego), Assistant Professor
  • M. Cummings, B.A. (York), M.A. (Dalhousie), Ph.D. (York), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • B. Dahl, B.A. (California, San Diego), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor
  • G. Daswani, B.Sc. (National University of Singapore), M.Sc., Ph.D. (London School of Economics), Associate Professor
  • G. Dewar, B.Sc., MA. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Cape Town), Associate Professor
  • L. Janz, B.A. (McGill), M.A., Ph.D. (Arizona), Assistant Professor
  • K. Kilroy-Marac, B.A. (Wisconsin-Madison), M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor
  • C. Krupa, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (California, Davis), Associate Professor
  • M. Lambek, B.A. (McGill), M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan), F.R.S.C., Professor Emeritus
  • L. Mortensen, B.A. (Cornell), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • A. Paz, B.A. (Queen's), M.A. (Tel Aviv), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor
  • L. Sawchuk, B.A., M.A. (Manitoba), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • M. Schillaci, B.A. (New Mexico), M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (New Mexico), Associate Professor
  • M. Silcox, B.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor
  • J. Teichroeb, B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D. (Calgary), Associate Professor
  • D. Young, B.A., M.A. (New Brunswick), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor

Program Chair: S. Bamford
Program Advisor Email: anthropologyadvisor.utsc@utoronto.ca

For more information, visit the departmental website.

Anthropology is the study of humankind, dealing with the origin, development and nature of humans and their culture in all its varieties. As such, it is concerned with human phenomena in the widest possible terms, both biological and cultural. It differs from other social sciences in its comparative and historical approach and in its intimate links with both the natural sciences and the humanities. Anthropology examines societies today and in the past, including relatively remote and small-scale societies, complex civilizations, and contemporary global and transnational interconnections.

From this vantage point, Anthropology attempts to understand the common factors underlying human existence and the factors that produce social change and differences between people and cultures.

Due to its vast subject matter, Anthropology is traditionally divided into four subject fields: Socio-cultural Anthropology, Evolutionary Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, and Archaeology. At the present time, the University of Toronto Scarborough offers programs within two major streams: Socio-cultural and Evolutionary Anthropology. Some Linguistic Anthropology courses are also offered and are closely linked to the Socio-cultural stream. Some Archaeology is offered and is closely linked to the Evolutionary stream.

Students intending to complete a program in Anthropology should take ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 within their first year in order to prepare them for more advanced courses. Students normally select whether to pursue the Socio-cultural stream (which leads to a B.A. degree) or the Evolutionary Anthropology stream (which leads to a B.Sc. degree) at the beginning of their second year of study but are encouraged to take courses in both streams.  All courses in Evolutionary Anthropology, including those in Archaeology, carry a science credit.

Combined Degree Programs, Honours Bachelor of Science or Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Programs for UTSC Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) /Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) with the Master of Teaching (MT) offered by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education provides students with a direct pathway to the completion, in 6 years, of their Undergraduate degree, Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications, and Master’s degree.​ These Combined Degree Programs allow students to complete 1.0 credits in courses that may be counted towards both degrees.

The Combined Degree Programs options are:

  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

For more information, including Admission and Program requirements, see the Combined Degree Programs section of the Calendar.​

Program Combination Restrictions in Anthropology

Students may combine their Specialist or Major program in Evolutionary Anthropology with either the Specialist or Major program in Socio-Cultural Anthropology, however, the following combinations are restricted:

  • The Specialist and Major programs in Evolutionary Anthropology cannot be combined;
  • The Specialist and Major programs in Socio-Cultural Anthropology cannot be combined;
  • The Minor in Anthropology cannot be combined with any other programs in Anthropology.

Experiential Learning and Outreach

For a community-based experiential learning opportunity in your academic field of interest, consider the course CTLB03H3, which can be found in the Teaching and Learning section of the Calendar.

anthropology Programs

COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAMS, HONOURS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OR HONOURS BACHELOR OF ARTS / MASTER OF TEACHING

The Combined Degree Programs for UTSC Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc)/ Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) with the Master of Teaching (MT) offered by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are designed for students who are interested in a career in Education. They allow exceptional students who are registered in one of the 50 identified Specialist and Major programs to gain early admission to the MT, which is a full-time professional program that leads to both a Master's degree and eligibility to become a certified teacher in Ontario. Students who successfully complete one of the Combined Degree Programs listed below will earn two University of Toronto degrees (HBA/ HBSc and MT), and be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for a Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers.

Contact Information:
Combined Degree Programs Coordinator
Email: cdp.utsc@utoronto.ca

The Combined Degree Programs options are:

Department of Anthropology

  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Arts, Culture and Media

  • Theatre and Performance Studies (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Biological Sciences

  • Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Biology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Integrative Biology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology, Immunology and Disease (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Plant Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences

  • Mathematics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of English

  • English (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Language Studies

  • French (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Historical and Cultural Studies

  • History (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • History (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Human Geography

  • Human Geography (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Geography (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences

  • Medicinal and Biological Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Medicinal and Biological Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Biochemistry (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Biochemistry (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Global Environmental Change (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Global Environmental Change (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Physics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Physics (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physics and Astrophysics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physics and Astrophysics (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physical and Mathematical Sciences (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of Sociology

  • Sociology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Sociology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Students applying to the MT must have two teaching subjects regardless of the concentration they are applying to (Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate, or Intermediate/Senior), and must have completed at least 6.0 credits in their first teaching subject and at least 3.0 credits in their second teaching subject (note: both French as a Second Language and Science require at least 6.0 credits in university courses even when they are a second teaching subject). Each of the programs listed below includes a minimum of 6.0 credits in courses that can be applied towards the completion of the prerequisites for the identified OISE teaching subject(s).

UTSC Programs Fit With OISE MT Teaching Subjects:

UTSC Program MT Teaching Subjects - Required Number of Courses/Credits Completed
- Specialist/ Specialist Co-op in Medicinal and Biological Chemistry Science - Chemistry, or
Science - Biology, or
Science - General
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Science - Biology, or
Science - General
- Major/Major Co-op In Biochemistry
- Major in Biology
- Specialist in Conservation and Biodiversity
- Major in Conservation and Biodiversity
- Specialist in Human Biology
- Major in Human Biology
- Specialist in Integrative Biology
- Major in Molecular Biology, Immunology and Disease
- Major in Plant Biology
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Global Environmental Change

Science - Biology

 

- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Chemistry
- Major/Major Co-op in Chemistry
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Environmental Chemistry
Science - Chemistry
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Environmental Physics
- Specialist in Physics and Astrophysics
- Major in Physics and Astrophysics
- Specialist in Physical and Mathematical Sciences
Science - Physics
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Mathematics
- Major/Major Co-op in Mathematics
Mathematics
- Specialist in Evolutionary Anthropology
- Major in Evolutionary Anthropology
- Specialist in Socio-Cultural Anthropology
- Major in Socio-Cultural Anthropology
- Specialist in Sociology
- Major in Sociology
Social Science - General
- Major in Theatre and Performance Studies Dramatic Arts
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in English
- Major/Major Co-op in English
English
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in French
- Major/Major Co-op in French
French (Second Language)
- Specialist in History
- Major in History
History
- Specialist in Human Geography
- Major in Human Geography
Geography

Application Process:

  • Applicants must apply to the Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA)/ Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) program, the MT program and the CDP.
  • Qualified students in Year 3 of their HBA/ HBSc degree program apply to the MT program; those accepted will receive a conditional offer to start the MT program upon completion of their HBA/ HBSc program and degree requirements.

Minimum Admission Requirements:

To be considered for conditional admission to the MT program and the selected CDP, applicants must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Be admitted to the HBA/ HBSc degree and at least one of the above-listed undergraduate programs at UTSC.
  • Meet the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies and the MT program.
  • Be enrolled full-time and in good standing in the HBA/ HBSc program(s):
    • have a B+ average or higher in Year 2;
    • carry a full course load of 5.0 credits each year (i.e., complete 5.0 credits over the three academic sessions - Fall, Winter, Summer); where necessary, exceptions will be made for students in Co-op programs.
  • Have completed at least half of the teaching subjects' prerequisite courses - i.e., 3.0 credits in the first teaching subject and at least 1.5 credits in the second teaching subject (or 3.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science) - by the end of Year 3.
  • Provide at least two letters of reference (see: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Home.html).
  • Provide a Statement of Intent indicating their preferred concentration (Primary/Junior, Junior Intermediate, or Intermediate/Senior) and describe three significant teaching and/or teaching-related experiences they have had, especially with groups of children; with reference to these experiences, applicants should identify insights gained about teaching and learning, and explain how, based on these insights, they might contribute to the education of students in today's schools. On their resumé, applicants must list, in chart form, the extent of their teaching experiences; the chart should include dates, location of the experience, applicants' role, and number of hours working with students.
  • Meet other qualifications as specified by the MT program, including: a police record check, relevant teaching experiences, academic and professional references, and satisfying teaching subject prerequisites.

To be given full, unconditional admission to the MT program, applicants must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Maintain a B+ average or higher in their final year of study in the HBA/ HBSc program, or over upper-level (C- and D-level) courses.
  • Achieve at least a B+ average in 1.0 credit in graduate courses taken in Year 4.
  • Regardless of the concentration to which they are applying (Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate, Intermediate/Senior), complete the prerequisites for both the first and second teaching subjects; students are encouraged to consult often with their HBA/HBSc Program Supervisor, as well as the Combined Degree Programs Coordinator.
  • Be conferred with the HBA/ HBSc degree.

Program Requirements and Path to Completion:

  • Year 1 to 4: HBA/ HBSc degree requirements:
    • students must complete all of the HBA/ HBSc program and degree requirements;
    • students are expected to carry a full course load of 5.0 credits over the three academic sessions (Fall, Winter, Summer) of each year;
    • in Year 3, qualified students may apply to the MT and the CDP and may be offered conditional admission to the MT;
    • by the end of Year 3 students must complete at least 3.0 credits required for the first teaching subject, and at least 1.5 credits for the second teaching subject (or 3.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science);
    • in Year 4, students who receive a conditional offer of admission to the CDP must complete any two of the graduate elective half courses recommended by OISE for CDP students; these courses (1.0 credit) are counted towards the completion of both the HBA/ HBSc degree and the MT program and degree; CDP students are graded as graduate students in these courses and are required to meet graduate expectations;
    • by the end of Year 4, students must complete all HBA/ HBSc program requirements and degree requirements, including at least 6.0 credits required for the first teaching subject, and  at least 3.0 credits for the second teaching subject (or 6.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science).
  • Year 5 and 6: Remaining MT program and degree requirements:
    • students must complete 11.0 credits as identified by OISE.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY (SCIENCE)

The Specialist Program in Evolutionary Anthropology is intended to provide the professionally oriented student with background preparation of sufficient breadth and depth to pursue specialized training at the graduate level. It is also designed to offer interested students a course structure as background for a wide range of occupations and professions. Students are encouraged to consult with the Undergraduate Counsellor regarding the selection of a course sequence appropriate to their interests and objectives. In exceptional circumstances, supervised research and reading courses are available at the C- and D-levels (ANTC04H3, ANTD32H3). These courses require special arrangements prior to registration. Read the descriptions for these courses carefully as restrictions apply.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 12.0 credits, as indicated below.

1.  1.0 credit as follows:
ANTA01H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

2.  ANTB14H3 Biological Anthropology: Beginnings

3.  ANTB15H3 Contemporary Human Evolution and Variation

4.  10.0 credits at the B-level or above, of which at least 5.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level, including at least 1.0 credit at the D-level. At least 7.5 credits must be composed of ANT courses identified as "Science credit" in the UTSC Academic Calendar.

Note: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 are prerequisites for C- and D-level courses in the Evolutionary Anthropology program.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (ARTS)

The Specialist Program in Socio-Cultural Anthropology is intended to provide the professionally oriented student with background preparation of sufficient breadth and depth to pursue specialized training at the graduate level. It is also designed to offer interested students a course structure as background for a wide range of occupations and professions. Students are encouraged to consult with the Undergraduate Counsellor regarding the selection of a course sequence appropriate to their interests and objectives. In exceptional circumstances, supervised research and reading courses are available at the C- and D-levels (ANTC03H3, ANTD31H3). These courses require special arrangements prior to registration. Read the descriptions for these courses carefully as restrictions apply.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 12.0 credits, as indicated below

1. 1.0 credit as follows:
ANTA01H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

2. ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies

3. ANTB20H3 Ethnography of the Global Contemporary

4. 10.0 credits at the B-level or above, of which at least 5.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level, including at least 1.5 credits at the D-level. Students must ensure that as part of Requirement 4, they complete:
a. At least 1.0 credit in area studies courses: ANTB05H3, ANTB16H3, ANTB18H3, ANTB26H3/​(ANTC89H3), ANTB65H3, ANTC12H3, or ANTD07H3
b. At least 0.5 credit in Ethnographic methods: ANTC70H3
c. At least 0.5 credit from among ANTD05H3, ANTD06H3, or ANTD15H3

Note: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 are prerequisites for C- and D-level courses in the Socio-Cultural Anthropology program.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY (SCIENCE)

The Major program in Evolutionary Anthropology provides a course structure for those students desiring to expand upon or supplement other areas of academic interest by taking advantage of Anthropology's unique global, chronological, and biological perspective on the human condition.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 8.0 credits in Anthropology including:

1.  1.0 credit as follows:
ANTA01H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

2.  ANTB14H3 Biological Anthropology: Beginnings

3.  ANTB15H3 Contemporary Human Evolution and Variation

4.  6.0 credits at the B-level or above, of which at least 3.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level. At least 5.5 credits must be composed of ANT courses identified as "Science credit" in the UTSC Academic Calendar.

Note: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 are prerequisites for C- and D-level courses in the Evolutionary Anthropology program.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (ARTS)

The Major program in Socio-Cultural Anthropology provides a course structure for those students desiring to expand upon or supplement other areas of academic interest by taking advantage of Anthropology's unique global, chronological, and biological perspective on the human condition.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 8.0 credits in Anthropology including:

1. 1.0 credit as follows:
ANTA01H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

2. ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies

3. ANTB20H3 Ethnography of the Global Contemporary

4. 6.0 credits at the B-level or above, of which at least 3.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level. Students must ensure that as part of Requirement 4, they complete:
a. At least 1.0 credits in area studies courses ANTB05H3, ANTB16H3, ANTB18H3, ANTB26H3/​(ANTC89H3), ANTB65H3, ANTC12H3, or ANTD07H3
b. 0.5 credit from Ethnographic methods: ANTC70H3
c. At least 0.5 credit from among ANTD05H3, ANTD06H3, ANTD15H3

Note: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 are prerequisites for C- and D-level courses in the Socio-Cultural Anthropology program.

MINOR PROGRAM IN ANTHROPOLOGY (ARTS)

The Minor Program in Anthropology provides a course structure for students majoring or specializing in other disciplines who want some directed exposure to anthropological thought.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 4.0 credits as follows:

1. 1.0 credits as follows:
ANTA01H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

2. At least 1.0 credit from among the following:
ANTB14H3 Biological Anthropology: Beginnings
ANTB15H3 Contemporary Human Evolution and Variation
ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
ANTB20H3 Ethnography of the Global Contemporary
ANTB80H3 Introduction to Archaeology: Methods, Theories, and Practices


3. 2.0 additional credits in Anthropology, of which 1.0 credit must be at the C- or D-level.

CERTIFICATE IN BIOARCHAEOLOGY

This Certificate will provide students with concentrated training in Bioarchaeology, the subdiscipline of Archaeology that focuses on the study of biological materials from archaeological sites, with a particular emphasis on skeletal remains (both human and non-human).
Note: Courses for which students have selected the CR/NCR option, cannot be used towards the completion of this Certificate

Enrolment Requirements

Students must be enrolled in either the Specialist or Major program in Evolutionary Anthropology.

Certificate Requirements
Students must complete a total of 2.0 credits as follows*:

ANTB80H3 Introduction to Archaeology: Methods, Theories, and Practices
ANTC47H3 Human and Primate Comparative Osteology
ANTC48H3 Advanced Topics In Human Osteology
ANTD35H3 Bioarchaeology
*Students must earn an average GPA of 2.7 across the four courses to be awarded the Certificate.

CERTIFICATE IN EVOLUTIONARY ANATOMY

This certificate will provide students with detailed knowledge of skeletal and dental anatomy in humans and related taxa from diverse perspectives, as well as a solid understanding of the evolutionary processes that led to that anatomy.


Admission Requirements

Successful completion of an undergraduate degree with a CGPA of 3.0 with a Specialist or Major in any Science discipline is required to enrol in the certificate program.

Students who have previously completed courses identified as requirements or options in the Certificate can substitute up to 1.0 credit in previously completed courses for the Certificate requirements. Students are not eligible for admission to the Certificate if they have already completed more than 2.0 credits of the included courses (or their equivalents from other universities).

Certificate Requirements

Students must complete 3.0 credits as follows:

1. Core required courses (1.5 credit):
ANTB14H3* Biological Anthropology: Beginnings
ANTC47H3 Human and Primate Comparative Osteology
ANTC48H3 Advanced Topics In Human Osteology

2. Advanced courses (1.5 credits):
Choose 3 from:
ANTC16H3 The Foundation and Theory of Human Origins
ANTC17H3** Human Origins: New Discoveries
ANTC99H3 Primate Evolution
ANTD17H3 Medical Osteology: Public Health Perspectives on Human Skeletal Health
ANTD35H3 Bioarchaeology
ANTD99H3 Advanced Topics in Primate Evolution

Notes:
*ANTA01H3 is a prerequisite for ANTB14H3.
**[ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3] are prerequisites for ANTC17H3.

Students seeking to complete the certificate who have not completed ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 will be assessed for admission to ANTB14H3 and/or ANTC17H3 based on their background. In particular, students whose undergraduate degree included Biology courses will normally be permitted to take ANTB14H3 and ANTC17H3 without the prerequisite(s).


Anthropology Courses

ANTA01H3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Becoming Human

An introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology. Concentrates on the origins and evolution of human life, including both biological and archaeological aspects, from the ancient past to the present.
Science credit

Exclusion: ANT100Y, ANT101H
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTA02H3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language

How does an anthropological perspective enable us to understand cultural difference in an interconnected world? In this course, students will learn about the key concepts of culture, society, and language. Drawing upon illustrations of family, economic, political, and religious systems from a variety of the world's cultures, this course will introduce students to the anthropological approach to studying and understanding human ways of life.

Exclusion: ANT100Y, ANT102H
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB01H3 - Political Ecology

This course examines human-environmental relations from an anthropological perspective. Throughout the semester, we explore how peoples from different parts of the globe situate themselves within culturally constructed landscapes. Topics covered include ethnoecology, conservation, green consumerism, the concept of 'wilderness', and what happens when competing and differentially empowered views of the non-human world collide.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB05H3 - Culture and Society in Africa

An overview of the range and diversity of African social institutions, religious beliefs and ritual, kinship, political and economic organization, pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial experience.
Same as AFSB05H3
Area course

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or AFSA01H3
Exclusion: AFSB05H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB09H3 - Culture through Film and Media

How is culture represented through visual media, from ethnographic and documentary film, to feature films, television, and new media? How do various communities re-vision themselves through mass, independent, or new media? This course investigates media and its role in the contemporary world from a socio-cultural anthropological perspective.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3
Enrolment Limits: 120
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB11H3 - World Prehistory

This introduction to archaeology focuses on how societies around the world have changed through time from the earliest humans to the emergence of state-level societies. This course uses a global perspective to address key issues such as evidence of the earliest art, development of agriculture, and the origins of social inequality and warfare.

Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Enrolment Limits: None
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: None

ANTB12H3 - Anthropology of Science Fiction

This course is about science fiction as a form of cultural and political critique. The course will explore themes that are central to both ethnography and science fiction, including topics such as colonialism, gender, and the climate crisis, while reflecting on the power of writing and myth-making to produce meaning and the future.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3, or any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC, ENG or HCS courses, or permission of the instructor
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Enrolment Limits: 80 students
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: None

ANTB14H3 - Biological Anthropology: Beginnings

This course surveys humanity's origin. The synthetic theory of evolution, its principles, processes, evidence and application underlie this course. Lecture topics and laboratory projects include: evolutionary theory, human variation, human adaptability, primate biology, and behaviour, taxonomy and classification, paleontological principles and human origins.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3
Exclusion: ANT203Y
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTB15H3 - Contemporary Human Evolution and Variation

Basic to the course is an understanding of the synthetic theory of evolution and the principles, processes, evidence and application of the theory. Laboratory projects acquaint the student with the methods and materials utilized Biological Anthropology. Specific topics include: the development of evolutionary theory, the biological basis for human variation, the evolutionary forces, human adaptability and health and disease.
Science credit
Same as HLTB20H3

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 or [HLTA02H3 and HLTA03H3]
Exclusion: ANT203Y, HLTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTB16H3 - Canadian Cultural Identities

This course explores the creation or invention of a Canadian national identity in literature, myth and symbolism, mass media, and political culture. Ethnographic accounts that consider First Nations, regional, and immigrant identities are used to complicate the dominant story of national unity.
Area course

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB18H3 - Development, Inequality and Social Change in Latin America

This course addresses Latin American systems of inequality in relation to national and transnational political economy, from colonialism to neoliberalism; how ideas of race, culture, and nation intersect with development thinking and modernization agendas; and how the poor and marginalized have accommodated, resisted, and transformed cultural and political domination.
Area course

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3
Exclusion: (ANTC08H3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB19H3 - Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of ethnography, the intensive study of people's lives as shaped by social relations, cultural beliefs, and historical forces. Various topics, including religion, economics, politics, and kinship introduce students to key anthropological concepts and theoretical developments in the field.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: ANT204Y, ANT207H1
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB20H3 - Ethnography and the Global Contemporary

How has the global flow of goods, persons, technologies, and capital reproduced forms of inequality? Using ethnography and other media, students examine globalization through topics like migration, race and citizenship, environmental degradation, and increasing violence while also discussing older anthropological concerns (e.g., kinship, religious practices, and authority). This course enhances students’ understanding of ethnography, as a method for studying how actors engage and rework the global forces shaping their lives.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: ANT204Y, ANT204H
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB22H3 - Primate Behaviour

This course will provide students with a general introduction to the behaviour and ecology of non-human primates (prosimians, Old and New World monkeys, and apes), with a particular emphasis on social behaviour. The course will consist of lectures reinforced by course readings; topics covered will include dominance, affiliation, social and mating systems, communication, and reproduction.
Science credit

Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTB26H3 - The Middle East and North Africa: Past and Present

What makes the Middle East and North Africa unique as a world region? This course considers the enduring impact of the past colonial encounter with the North Atlantic, as well as religious movements, nationalist histories, the impact of new communication technologies, and regional conflicts. Examples are drawn from a variety of contexts.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: (ANTC89H3)
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB33H3 - The Future of Work

This course explores a pressing issue facing contemporary life: “the future of work.” It examines how work has been and continues to be transformed by automation, digital technologies, climate change, pandemics, the retrenchment of the welfare state, deindustrialization, global supply chains, and imperial and colonial rule. All kinds of media (e.g., academic texts, corporate publications, policy reports, activist literature, cinema) will be utilized to demonstrate how these transformations are not limited to work or labour but reverberate across social, political, and economic life.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 and [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses] or permission of the instructor
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: A general interest and knowledge of economic and political anthropology.
Enrolment Limits: 80 Students
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB35H3 - Kids These Days: Youth, Language and Media

Around the world, youth is understood as the liminal phase in our lives. This course examines how language and new media technologies mark the lives of youth today. We consider social media, smartphones, images, romance, youth activism and the question of technological determinism. Examples are drawn from a variety of contexts.
Same as MDSB09H3

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or MDSA01H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: MDSB09H3
Breadth Requirements: Arts, Literature and Language

ANTB36H3 - Anthropology of the End of the World

A cultural and comparative study of apocalyptic thought, practice, and representation around the world. It explores the conditions that inspire end times thinking and the uses it serves. Cases may include: millenarian movements, Revelation, colonialism, epidemics, infertility, deindustrialization, dystopian science fiction, nuclear war, climate change, and zombies.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB64H3 - Are You What You Eat?: The Anthropology of Food

This course examines the social significance of food and foodways from the perspective of cultural anthropology. We explore how the global production, distribution, and consumption of food, shapes or reveals, social identities, political processes, and cultural relations. Lectures are supplemented by hands-on tutorials in the Culinaria Kitchen Laboratory.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: (ANTC64H3), ANT346H1
Enrolment Limits: 150
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTB65H3 - An Introduction to Pacific Island Societies

Introduces the cultures and peoples of the Pacific. Examines the ethnography of the region, and the unique contributions that Pacific scholarship has made to the development of anthropological theory. Explores how practices of exchange, ritual, notions of gender, death and images of the body serve as the basis of social organization.
Area course

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Exclusion: (ANTC65H3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTB66H3 - Spiritual Paths: A Comparative Anthropology of Pilgrimage

A comparison of pilgrimage in different religious traditions, including Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Hindu and those of indigenous communities (such as the Huichol of Mexico) will introduce students to the anthropology of religion. We will consider the aspirations and experiences of various pilgrims, while being mindful of cultural similarities and differences.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 or [any 4.0 credits]
Exclusion: RLG215H
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTB80H3 - Introduction to Archaeology: Methods, Theories, and Practices

This course introduces students to the methods, theories, and practices used in Archaeology. Building on the course material presented in ANTA01H3, there will be a focus on important themes in Archaeology as a subfield of Anthropology, including: artefact analysis, dating methods, theories of the origins of social development/complexity, and careers in archaeology today. This course will include lectures and complimentary readings that will expose students to the important ideas within the field. There will also be an experiential component in the form of four hands-on workshops where students will get to interact with artefacts and gain experience using some of the methods discussed in class. There will be an extra workshop for students to get help with their essay outline.

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3
Exclusion: ANT200Y1, ANT200Y5, ANT200H5
Enrolment Limits: 150
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTC03H3 - Directed Reading in Anthropology

A directed exploration of specific topics in Anthropology, based on extensive investigation of the literature.
These courses are available in exceptional circumstances and do not duplicate regular course offerings. Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering. Individual tutorials, as arranged. A minimum B plus average is normally required to be considered for these courses. May be science credit or area course depending on topic.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 and [one B-level full credit in Anthropology in the appropriate sub-field (biological or cultural)].

ANTC04H3 - Directed Reading in Anthropology

A directed exploration of specific topics in Anthropology, based on extensive investigation of the literature.
These courses are available in exceptional circumstances and do not duplicate regular course offerings. Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering. Individual tutorials, as arranged. A minimum B plus average is normally required to be considered for these courses. May be science credit or area course depending on topic.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 and [one B-level full credit in Anthropology in the appropriate sub-field (biological or cultural)].

ANTC07H3 - Material Worlds

This course explores the intersection of the social and the material by examining the role of objects in making worlds. We examine the relationship between people, culture, and 'things' through topics such as commodification and consumption, collecting and representation, technology and innovation, art and artifact, and the social life of things. 

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC09H3 - Sex, Love, and Intimacy: Anthropological Approaches to Kinship and Marriage

This course explores Anthropological approaches to kinship and family arrangements. In addition to examining the range of forms that family arrangements can take cross-culturally, we also examine how kinship configurations have changed within our own society in recent years. Topics to be covered include trans-national adoption, "mail-order-brides", new reproductive technologies and internet dating.

Prerequisite: ANTA02H3 and ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC10H3 - Anthropological Perspectives on Development

A critical probe of the origins, concepts, and practices of regional and international development in cultural perspective. Attention is paid to how forces of global capitalism intersect with local systems of knowledge and practice.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC12H3 - Culture and Society in Contemporary South Asia

This course surveys central issues in the ethnographic study of contemporary South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). Students will engage with classical and recent ethnographies to critically examine key thematic fault lines within national imaginations, especially along the lines of religion, caste, gender, ethnicity, and language. Not only does the course demonstrate how these fault lines continually shape the nature of nationalism, state institutions, development, social movements, violence, and militarism across the colonial and post-colonial periods but also, demonstrates how anthropological knowledge and ethnography provide us with a critical lens for exploring the most pressing issues facing South Asia in the world today.

Same as GASC12H3

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3, or permission of the instructor] or [Any 4.0 credits, including 0.5 credit at the A- or B-level in GAS or Africa and Asia Area HIS courses]
Exclusion: GASC12H3
Enrolment Limits: 80
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC14H3 - Feminism and Anthropology

Examines why, when, and how gender inequality became an anthropological concern by tracing the development of feminist thought in a comparative ethnographic framework.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [1.0 credit at the B-level in WST courses]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC15H3 - Genders and Sexualities

Explores cultural constructions of male and female in a range of societies and institutions. Also examines non-binary gender configurations.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [1.0 credit at the B-level in WST courses]
Recommended Preparation: ANTC14H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC16H3 - The Foundation and Theory of Human Origins

The study of human origins in light of recent approaches surrounding human evolution. This course will examine some of these, particularly the process of speciation, with specific reference to the emergence of Homo. Fossils will be examined, but the emphasis will be on the interpretations of the process of hominisation through the thoughts and writings of major workers in the field.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 or ANTB14H3 or ANTC17H3
Exclusion: (ANT332Y)
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC17H3 - Human Origins: New Discoveries

The study of human origins in light of recent approaches surrounding human evolution. New fossil finds present new approaches and theory. This course will examine some of these, particularly the process of speciation and hominisation with specific reference to the emergence of Homo. Labs permit contact with fossils in casts.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3
Exclusion: (ANT332Y)
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC18H3 - Urban Worlds

The planet today is more urbanized than at any other moment in its history. What are the tools we need to examine urbanization in this contemporary moment? This course explores how urbanization has altered everyday life for individuals and communities across the globe. Students will trace urbanization as transformative of environmental conditions, economic activities, social relations, and political life. Students will thus engage with work on urbanization to examine how urban spaces and environments come to be differentiated along the lines of race, class, and gender. Not only does this course demonstrate how such fault lines play themselves out across contexts, but also provides the critical lenses necessary to tackle the most pressing issues related to urbanization today.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [1.5 credits at the B-level in CIT courses]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC19H3 - Producing People and Things: Economics and Social Life

This course examines economic arrangements from an anthropological perspective. A key insight to be examined concerns the idea that by engaging in specific acts of production, people produce themselves as particular kinds of human beings. Topics covered include gifts and commodities, consumption, global capitalism and the importance of objects as cultural mediators in colonial and post-colonial encounters.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC20H3 - Gifts, Money and Morality

What limits exist or can be set to commoditized relations? To what extent can money be transformed into virtue, private goods into the public "Good"? We examine the anthropological literature on gift-giving, systems of exchange and value, and sacrifice. Students may conduct a short ethnographic project on money in our own society, an object at once obvious and mysterious.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC22H3 - Education, Power, and Potential: Anthropological Perspectives and Ethnographic Insights

What does it mean to get an education? What are the consequences of getting (or not getting) a “good education”? For whom? Who decides? Why does it matter? How are different kinds of education oriented toward different visions of the future? What might we learn about a particular cultural context if we explore education and learning as social processes and cultural products linked to specific cultural values, beliefs, and power dynamics? These are just some of the questions we will explore in this course. Overall, students will gain a familiarity with the anthropology of education through an exploration of ethnographic case studies from a variety of historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3]
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: A version of this course was taught as a special topics course in Fall 2021; therefore, students who took ANTC88 in Fall 2021 should be excluded.
Recommended Preparation: None
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in any of the following Combined Degree Programs: Evolutionary Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching Evolutionary Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

ANTC24H3 - Culture, Mental Illness, and Psychiatry

Does schizophrenia exist all over the world?  Does depression look different in China than it does in Canada?  By examining how local understandings of mental illness come into contact with Western psychiatric models, this course considers the role of culture in the experience, expression, definition, and treatment of mental illness and questions the universality of Western psychiatric categories. 

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or HLTB42H3
Recommended Preparation: ANTC61H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC25H3 - Anthropology and Psychology

How are we to understand the relationship between psychological universals and diverse cultural and social forms in the constitution of human experience? Anthropology's dialogue with Freud; cultural construction and expression of emotions, personhood, and self.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC27H3 - Primate Sociality

Primates are an intensely social order of animals showing wide variation in group size, organization and structure. Using an evolutionary perspective, this course will focus on why primates form groups and how their relationships with different individuals are maintained, with reference to other orders of animals. The form and function of different social systems, mating systems, and behaviours will be examined.

Prerequisite: ANTB22H3
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC30H3 - Themes in Global Archaeology

Intensive survey of a particular world region or current theme in archaeological research. Topic will change year to year.

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 and [ANTB11H3 or ANTB80H3
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Enrolment Limits: None
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: None

ANTC31H3 - Ritual and Religious Action

The nature and logic of ritual. Religious practices and projects; the interface of religion, power, morality, and history in the contemporary world.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC32H3 - Political Anthropology

Can ethnographic research help us make sense of various political situations and conflicts around the world? In this course we will review different approaches to power and politics in classical and current anthropology. We will consider notions of the state, political agency and power, civil society, authoritarianism and democracy.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC33H3 - Of Gods and Humans: Anthropological Approaches to Religion

Anthropological approaches to the origin and function of religion, and the nature of symbolism, myth, ritual, sorcery, spirit possession, and cosmology, with primary reference to the religious worlds of small-scale societies.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Exclusion: (ANTB30H3)
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC34H3 - The Anthropology of Transnationalism

This course considers dimensions of transnationalism as a mode of human sociality and site for cultural production. Topics covered include transnational labour migration and labour circuits, return migration, the transnational dissemination of electronic imagery, the emergence of transnational consumer publics, and the transnational movements of refugees, kinship networks, informal traders and religions.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [any 8.0 credits in ANT, HLT, IDS, CIT, GGR, POL, SOC or HCS courses]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC35H3 - Quantitative Methods in Anthropology

A consideration of quantitative data and analytical goals, especially in archaeology and biological anthropology. Some elementary computer programming, and a review of program packages suitable for anthropological analyses will be included.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3
Exclusion: MGEB11H3/(ECMB11H3), PSYB07H3, (SOCB06H3), STAB22H3
Recommended Preparation: ANTB15H3
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

ANTC40H3 - Methods and Analysis in Anthropological Demography

An examination of the biological, demographic, ecological and socio-cultural determinants of human and non-human population structure and the interrelationships among them. Emphasis is given to constructing various demographic measures of mortality, fertility and immigration and their interpretation.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 and [any statistics course]
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

ANTC41H3 - Environmental Stress, Culture and Human Adaptability

Human adaptability refers to the human capacity to cope with a wide range of environmental conditions, including aspects of the physical environment like climate (extreme cold and heat), high altitude, geology, as well as aspects of the socio-cultural milieu, such as pathogens (disease), nutrition and malnutrition, migration, technology, and social change.
Science credit

Prerequisite: [ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3] or [BIOA01H3 and BIOA02H3]
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC42H3 - Human Growth, Development and Adaptability

Human adaptability refers to the human capacity to cope with a wide range of environmental conditions. Emphasis is placed on human growth and development in stressed and non-stressed environments. Case studies are used extensively.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTC41H3
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC44H3 - Amazonian Anthropology

This seminar explores anthropological insights and historical/archeological debates emerging from Amazonia, a hotspot of social and biodiversity currently under grave threat. We will look at current trends in the region, the cultural logic behind deforestation and land-grabbing, and the cultural and intellectual production of indigenous, ribeirinho, and quilombola inhabitants of the region.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and [ANTB20H3 or ANTB01H3 or ESTB01H3]
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Enrolment Limits: None
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: None

ANTC47H3 - Human and Primate Comparative Osteology

A "hands-on" Laboratory course which introduces students to analyzing human and nonhuman primate skeletal remains using a comparative framework. The course will cover the gross anatomy of the skeleton and dentition, as well as the composition and microstructure of bone and teeth. The evolutionary history and processes associated with observed differences in human and primate anatomy will be discussed.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3
Exclusion: ANT334H, ANT334Y
Enrolment Limits: 33
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC48H3 - Advanced Topics In Human Osteology

A "hands-on" laboratory course which introduces students to the methods of analyzing human skeletal remains. Topics and analytic methods include: (1) the recovery and treatment of skeletal remains from archaeological sites; (2) odontological description, including dental pathology; (3) osteometric description; (4) nonmetric trait description; (5) methods of estimating age at death and sex; (6) quantitative analysis of metric and nonmetric data; and (7) paleopathology.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTC47H3
Exclusion: ANT334H, ANT334Y
Enrolment Limits: 33
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC52H3 - Global Politics of Language

Language and ways of speaking are foundational to political cultures. This course covers the politics of language in the age of globalization, including multiculturalism and immigration, citizenship, race and ethnicity, post-colonialism, and indigeneity. Ethnographic examples are drawn from a variety of contexts, including Canadian official bilingualism and First Nations.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Arts, Literature and Language

ANTC53H3 - Anthropology of Media and Publics

How do media work to circulate texts, images, and stories? Do media create unified publics? How is the communicative process of media culturally-distinct? This course examines how anthropologists have studied communication that occurs through traditional and new media. Ethnographic examples drawn from several contexts.
Same as MDSC53H3

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [MDSA01H3 and MDSB05H3]
Exclusion: MDSC53H3
Breadth Requirements: Arts, Literature and Language

ANTC58H3 - Constructing the Other: Orientalism through Time and Place

This course reflects on the concept of Orientalism and how it informs the fields of Classical Studies and Anthropology. Topics to be discussed include the Orientalization of the past and the origin, role, and significance of ancient representations of the "Other" in contemporary discourses.
Same as CLAC68H3 and HISC68H3

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit from the following: [CLAA04H3/HISA07H3, CLAB05H3/HISB10H3, CLAB06H3/HISB11H3, ANTA02H3, ANTB19H3, ANTB20H3, HISB02H3, AFSB50H3/HISB50H3, AFSB51H3/HISB51H3, HISB53H3, HISB57H3, HISB58H3, HISB60H3, HISB61H3, HISB62H3, HISB93H3, HISB94H3]
Exclusion: CLAC68H3, HISC68H3
Enrolment Limits: 40
Breadth Requirements: History, Philosophy and Cultural Studies

ANTC59H3 - Anthropology of Language and Media

Anthropology studies language and media in ways that show the impact of cultural context. This course introduces this approach and also considers the role of language and media with respect to intersecting themes: ritual, religion, gender, race/ethnicity, power, nationalism, and globalization. Class assignments deal with lecturers, readings, and students' examples.
Same as MDSC21H3

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or [MDSA01H3 and MDSB05H3]
Exclusion: (ANTB21H3), (MDSB02H3), MDSC21H3
Breadth Requirements: Arts, Literature and Language

ANTC61H3 - Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing in Cultural Perspective

Social and symbolic aspects of the body, the life-cycle, the representation and popular explanation of illness, the logic of traditional healing systems, the culture of North American illness and biomedicine, mental illness, social roots of disease, innovations in health care delivery systems.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3] or HLTB42H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC62H3 - Medical Anthropology: Biological and Demographic Perspectives

The examination of health and disease in ecological and socio-cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on variability of populations in disease susceptibility and resistance in an evolutionary context. With its sister course, ANTC61H3, this course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and principles of medical anthropology. Principles of epidemiology, patterns of inheritance and biological evolution are considered.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC66H3 - Anthropology of Tourism

This course explores the global cultural phenomenon of tourism. Using case studies and historical perspectives, we investigate the complex motivations and consequences of travel, the dimensions of tourism as development, the ways tourism commodifies daily life, the politics of tourism representation, and the intersection of travel, authenticity and modernity.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTC67H3 - Foundations in Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the study of disease and its determinants in populations. It is grounded in the biomedical paradigm, statistical reasoning, and that risk is context specific. This course will examine such issues as: methods of sampling, types of controls, analysis of data, and the investigation of epidemics.
Science credit

Prerequisite: [Any B-level course in Anthropology or Biology] and [any statistics course].
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

ANTC68H3 - Deconstructing Epidemics

Colonization, globalization and socio-ecological factors play an important role in origin, maintenance and emergence of old and new infectious diseases in human populations such as yellow fever, cholera, influenza, SARS. Issues of co-morbidity, the epidemiological transition, syndemics and the impact of global warming on the emergence of new diseases are discussed.
Science credit

Prerequisite: [Any B-level course in Anthropology or Biology] and [any statistics course].
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC69H3 - Ideas That Matter: Key Themes and Thinkers in Anthropology

This course explores key themes, theories, and thinkers that have shaped anthropological thought, past and present. In any given year we will focus on the work of a particular important thinker or a school of thought. As we examine trends and approaches that have been influential to the field, we consider the debates these have generated, the ethnographic innovations they have inspired, and their relevance for core debates in anthropology. Topics and readings will be chosen annually by the instructor.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the specialist program in Anthropology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

ANTC70H3 - Ethnographic Methods in Anthropology: Past, Present, and Future

This course is an exploration of the ongoing significance of the ethnographic method to the practice of research in socio-cultural anthropology. How and why have ethnographic methods become so central to anthropology, and what can we continue to learn with them? Students complement readings and lectures on theories and practices of ethnographic methods, both historical and contemporary, with exercises and assignments designed to provide first-hand experience in carrying out various techniques of ethnographic research. We also consider the unique ethical challenges of ethnographic methods and what it means to conduct ethically sound research.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 0.5 credit at the C-level in socio-cultural anthropology courses].
Exclusion: (ANTC60H3)
Enrolment Limits: 40
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist in Anthropology, followed by students in the Major in Anthropology, followed by students in the Specialist programs in International Development Studies.

ANTC71H3 - Climate, Palaeoecology, and Policy: Archaeology of Humans in the Environment

This course examines the evolution of human-environment systems over deep time as well as the present implications of these relationships. We will examine the archaeological methods used in reconstructing human palaeoecology and engage with evolutionary and ecological theory as it has been applied to the archaeological record in order to understand how humans have altered ecosystems and adapted to changing climates through time and space. Building upon the perspective of humans as a long-term part of ecological systems, each student will choose a current environmental policy issue and progressively build a proposal for a remediation strategy or research program to address gaps in knowledge.

Prerequisite: [0.5 credit from the following: ANTA01H3, ANTB80H3, EESA01H3 or BIOB50H3] and [1.0 credit of additional B- or C- level courses in ANT, BIO, and/or ENV]
Recommended Preparation: A knowledge of evolutionary anthropology, archaeology, or relevant courses in ecology.
Enrolment Limits: 50
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTC80H3 - Race and Racism: Anthropological Insights

This course explores ideas of race and racist practice, both past and present. Socio-cultural perspectives on race and racism must address a central contradiction: although biological evidence suggests that racial categories are not scientifically valid, race and racism are real social phenomena with real consequences. In order to address this contradiction, the course will examine the myriad ways that race is produced and reproduced, as well as how racism is perpetuated and sustained.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC88H3 - Special Topics

The topics presented in this course will represent a range of contemporary issues in Anthropology. Topics will vary by instructor and term.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTC99H3 - Primate Evolution

This course examines 65 million years of evolutionary history for non-human primates. The primary emphasis will be on the fossil record. Topics covered may include the reconstruction of behaviour from fossil remains, the evolution of modern primate groups, and the origins of the Order.

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 or ANTB14H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD01H3 - The Body in Culture and Society

An ethnographic inquiry into the culturally configured human body as a reservoir of experiential knowledge, focus of symbolism, and site of social, moral, and political control.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in socio-cultural anthropology] or [1.0 credit at the C-level in WST courses]
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTD04H3 - The Anthropology of Violence and Suffering

This course examines the social life of violence, its cultural production and political effects in a global perspective. It asks how social worlds are made and unmade through, against, and after violent events, how violence is remembered and narrated, and how ethnography might respond to experiences of suffering, trauma, and victimhood.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 0.5 credit at the C-level in Socio-Cultural Anthropology].
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTD05H3 - Advanced Fieldwork Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology

This course provides students with experience in carrying out ethnographic research in the Greater Toronto Area. Working with the Center for Ethnography, students define and execute individual research projects of their own design. The course provides students with the opportunity to present and discuss their unfolding research, as well as to present the findings of their research. This course is completed over two terms, and culminates in an original research paper.

Prerequisite: [ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [(ANTC60H3) or ANTC70H3]] and [an additional 1.0 credit at the C-level in socio-cultural anthropology] and [a cumulative GPA of 2.7, or permission of the instructor]. Preference will be given to Specialists and Majors in Anthropology, in that order.
Exclusion: (ANTD05Y3)
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD06H3 - Reading Ethnography

This course considers the reading and writing of ethnography - the classic genre of socio-cultural anthropology. We examine what differentiates ethnography from other forms of research and how to distinguish ethnographic works of high quality. Also considered are the politics of representation, including how ethnographic writing may reflect unequal relationships of power.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in Socio-Cultural Anthropology.
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTD07H3 - Advanced Regional Seminar

This course allows students to examine particular culture areas at an advanced level. Regions to be covered may include South Asia, East Asia, the Muslim World, Latin America, The Pacific, Europe, Africa, or North America. Specific case studies from the region will be used to highlight theoretical and ethnographic issues.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 0.5 credit from previous area course] and [at least 0.5 credit at the C-level in Socio-Cultural Anthropology].
Enrolment Limits: 25

ANTD10H3 - The Anthropology of 'Life' Itself

This course will examine cultural understandings of ‘life’ – What is life? What is a life? How do humans value (or alternatively not value) life in different social and cultural settings? What constitutes a ‘good life’? To what degree are cultural understandings of ‘life’ entangled with those of ‘death’.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in socio-cultural anthropology courses]
Exclusion: (ANTC11H3)
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

ANTD13H3 - Frontiers of Anthropology: A Biological Perspective

An advanced seminar course primarily for majors and specialists in biological anthropology. Topic to be announced annually.

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 and [at least 0.5 credit at the C-level in Biological Anthropology].
Enrolment Limits: 25

ANTD15H3 - Frontiers of Socio-Cultural Anthropology

An advanced seminar course primarily for specialists and majors in Anthropology. Topic changes annually and is linked to the theme of our seminar series for the year. Students will attend talks by 2-3 guest speakers in addition to the regular seminar. In previous years, the theme has been Masculinities, Pilgrimage, History and Historicities.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in Socio-Cultural Anthropology].
Enrolment Limits: 25
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD16H3 - Biomedical Anthropology

This course is designed for advanced students seeking an intensive examination of specific problems in medical Anthropology. Problems to be discussed include: genetic disorders in families and populations, the interaction of malnutrition and infectious diseases in human populations, chronic non-infectious diseases in populations today, and epidemiology and medical anthropology as complementary disciplines.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTC62H3 and [1.0 credit at the C-level in Biological Anthropology].
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD17H3 - Medical Osteology: Public Health Perspectives on Human Skeletal Health

This seminar course will examine the clinical, epidemiological and public health literature on osteoporosis and other conditions impacting skeletal health. The course will also explore the potential economic impacts of osteoporosis on Canada's health care system given emerging demographic changes.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTC47H3 and ANTC48H3
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD19H3 - Primate Conservation

A large percentage of nonhuman primate species are at risk of extinction due mostly to human-induced processes. Relying on theory from Conservation Biology, this course will consider the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that lead to some primate species being threatened, while others are able to deal with anthropogenic influences. Students will critically examine conservation tactics and the uniqueness of each situation will be highlighted.

Prerequisite: ANTB22H3
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD20H3 - Culture and Community

A field-based research seminar exploring the cultural dimensions of community and sense of place. Partnering with community-based organizations in Scarborough and the GTA, students will investigate topical issues in the immediate urban environment from an anthropological perspective. Yearly foci may include food, heritage, diaspora, and family.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in Socio-Cultural Anthropology courses]
Recommended Preparation: (ANTC60H3) or ANTC70H3
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience

ANTD22H3 - Theory and Methodology in Primatology

This seminar course will examine contemporary theory and questions in primatology and carefully examine the types of data that researchers collect to answer their research questions.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB22H3
Enrolment Limits: 25

ANTD25H3 - Medical Primatology: Public Health Perspectives on Zoonotic Diseases

This course will examine the social and cultural contexts of animal-to-human disease transmission globally, and the public risks associated zoonoses present here in Canada. The course will incorporate both anthropological and epidemiological perspectives.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 and (HLTA01H3) and [ANTC35H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3]
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD26H3 - Caveman, Farmer, Herder, Trader: Evolution of Diet in Society

Beginning with archaic Homo sapiens and ending with a discussion of how diet exists in a modern globalized cash economy, this course engages an archaeological perspective on changes in human diet and corresponding societal shifts. We will explore paradigmatic discourse around topics such as big game hunting, diet breadth, niche construction, and the Agricultural Revolution, while examining the archaeological record to clarify what "cavemen" really ate, inquire whether agriculture was as "revolutionary" as it has been presented, and delve into evidence of how colonialism, capitalism, and globalization have shaped our modern diet. Discussions will aim to interrogate current theories and contextualize why scientists (and the public) think the way they do about diet in the past and present.

Prerequisite: [ANTA01H3 and ANTB80H3 and 1.0 credit from any course at the C-level] or [FSTA01H3 and 1.0 credit from any course at the C-level and permission of the instructor]
Recommended Preparation: Some courses in human evolution and archaeology are highly recommended, knowledge of and interest in food system and the human past are acceptable.
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD31H3 - Advanced Research in Anthropology

Directed critical examination of specific problems in Anthropology, based on library and/or field research.
These courses are available in exceptional circumstances and do not duplicate regular course offerings. Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering. Individual tutorials, as arranged. A minimum B plus average is normally required to be considered for these courses. May be science credit or area course depending on topic.

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 and [2.0 credits in Anthropology, of which 1.0 credit must be at the the C-level] and permission of the instructor.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD32H3 - Advanced Research in Anthropology

Directed critical examination of specific problems in Anthropology, based on library and/or field research.
These courses are available in exceptional circumstances and do not duplicate regular course offerings. Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering. Individual tutorials, as arranged. A minimum B plus average is normally required to be considered for these courses. May be science credit or area course depending on topic.

Prerequisite: ANTA01H3 and ANTA02H3 and [2.0 full credits in Anthropology, one of which must be at the C-level] and permission of the instructor.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD35H3 - Bioarchaeology

This course will focus on a new direction in anthropology, exploring the potential of skeletal remains in reconstructing past lifeways. This seminar style class will build upon concepts introduced in Human Osteology courses. Additionally, more advanced methods of reconstructing patterns of subsistence, diet, disease, demography and physical activity.

Prerequisite: ANTC47H3 and ANTC48H3
Exclusion: ANT434H, ANT441H
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

ANTD40H3 - Topics in Emerging Scholarship in Evolutionary Anthropology

Taught by an advanced PhD student or postdoctoral fellow, and based on his or her doctoral research and area of expertise, this course presents a unique opportunity to explore intensively a particular Evolutionary or Archaeological Anthropology topic in-depth. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and ANTB15H3 and [at least 2.0 credits at the C-level in Evolutionary Anthropology]
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist in Anthropology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

ANTD41H3 - Topics in Emerging Scholarship in Socio-Cultural Anthropology

Taught by an advanced PhD student or postdoctoral fellow, and based on his or her doctoral research and area of expertise, this course presents a unique opportunity to explore intensively a particular Socio-Cultural or Linguistic Anthropology topic in-depth. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: ANTB19H3 and ANTB20H3 and [at least 2.0 credits at the C-level in Sociocultural Anthropology]
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist program in Anthropology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

ANTD60H3 - Advanced Archaeological Laboratory Methods

This course provides specialized hands-on training in archaeological laboratory methods. Students will develop their own research project, undertaking analysis of archaeological materials, analyzing the resulting data, and writing a report on their findings. The methodological focus may vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: [ANTA01H3 and ANTB80H3] and [1.0 credits at the C-level in any field and permission of the instructor]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD70H3 - Archaeological Field Methods

This course provides specialized hands-on experience with field-based archaeology, including planning, survey, testing, and/or excavation, as well as an overview of various archaeological excavation methods and practices. Students may enroll in this course to gain credit for participation in approved off-campus field work. In this case, they will coordinate with the instructor to develop a series of appropriate assignments relevant to their coursework and learning goals.

Prerequisite: [ANTA01H3 and ANTB80H3] and [1.0 credits of additional C-level courses in any field and permission of instructor]
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

ANTD71H3 - Community Engaged Fieldwork with Food

This research seminar uses our immediate community of Scarborough to explore continuity and change within diasporic foodways. Students will develop and practise ethnographic and other qualitative research skills to better understand the many intersections of food, culture, and community. This course culminates with a major project based on original research.
Same as HISD71H3

Prerequisite: HISB14H3/(HISC14H3) or HISC04H3 or [2.0 credits in ANT courses of which 1.0 credit must be at the C-level] or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: HISD71H3
Recommended Preparation: ANTB64H3, ANTC70H3
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience

ANTD99H3 - Advanced Topics in Primate Evolution

This course will examine questions of particular controversy in the study of Primate Evolution. Topics to be covered may include the ecological context of primate origins, species recognition in the fossil record, the identification of the first anthropoids, and the causes of extinction of the subfossil lemurs.
Science credit

Prerequisite: ANTB14H3 and [at least 1.0 credit at the C-level in Biological Anthropology].
Exclusion: ANTD13H3 if completed in the 2010/2011 academic year
Recommended Preparation: ANTC99H3
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirements: Natural Sciences

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