Sociology

Faculty List

  • C. Childress, B.A. (Vassar College), M.A., Ph.D. (UC-Santa Barbara), Associate Professor
  • E.F. Elcioglu, M.A., Ph.D. (UC-Berkeley), Assistant Professor
  • E. Fosse, B.A. (Kansas), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor
  • A. Grigoryeva. B.A. (National University-Higher School of Economics, Moscow), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton), Assistant Professor
  • J. Hannigan, B.A., M.A. (Western), Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor
  • J. Hermer, B.A. (Western), M.A. (Carleton), D.Phil. (Oxon), Associate Professor
  • P-C. Hsiung, B.A. (National Chun-sing), M.A. (Chinese Cultural), M.A., Ph.D. (UCLA), Professor
  • W.W. Isajiw, B.A. (LaSalle), M.A., Ph.D. (Catholic University of America), Professor Emeritus
  • D. Kwan-Lafond, B.S.W. (Ryerson) M.A. (OISE-University of Toronto), Ph.D. Abd (York), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • P. Landolt, B.A., M.A. (York), M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor
  • K. Liddle, B.A. (Oberlin College), M.A. (Auburn University), Ph.D. (Emory), Associate Professor
  • A. Mullen, B.A. (UC-Berkeley), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor
  • R. O’Toole, B.A. (Leeds), PGCE (London), M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor Emeritus
  • R. Salem, B.A. (American University-Cairo), M.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Princeton), Associate Professor
  • M. Sarkar B.A. (Colby), M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor
  • A. Sev'er, B.A., M.A. (Windsor), Ph.D. (York), Professor Emerita
  • D. Silver, B.A. (UC-Berkeley), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor
  • N. Spence, B.A., Ph.D. (Western), Assistant Professor
  • J. Tanner, B.Sc. (London), PGCE (Leicester), M.A., Ph.D. (Alberta), Professor Emeritus
  • S. Ungar, B.A. (McGill), M.A., Ph.D. (York, Canada), Emeritus Associate Professor  


Program Chair: J. Hermer
Program Advisor Email: sociologyadvisor.utsc@utoronto.ca

Departmental website: https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/

Sociology challenges us to see the world in new ways to solve social problems, build resilient communities, and nurture democratic structures. Sociology seeks to explain how society is ordered and disordered, what accounts for social cohesion, cooperation, and conflict, and the causes of social inequality. Sociology is diverse. Sociologists study many social issues: the impact of race, religion, class and gender on life chances; institutions such as families, workplaces, and gangs; processes such as racialization, globalization and indigenization; and politics related to work, health, cultural pluralism, incarceration, and city building. What unifies sociology is the focus on how human action shapes and is shaped by surrounding structures. 

Sociology programs teach students how to design and carry out quantitative and qualitative research and analyze evidence to arrive at understanding and explanation. Students acquire a diverse set of transferable skills. You will learn to use theoretically informed and evidence-based arguments to assess concrete social problems. You will become adept at analyzing and interpreting statistics and qualitative data. You will develop excellent verbal and written communication skills and you will learn to translate research into effective social policy recommendations.

Students successfully completing a degree in Sociology at UTSC will acquire a strong foundation for both further studies at a graduate level and for professional careers in fields including law, education, science fields, social work and health care, marketing and communication, human resources, non-profit organizations and social policy among others.

Students are encouraged to contact the Program Advisor or Associate Chair to discuss program requirements and their individual course of study.

Combined Degree Programs, Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Programs for UTSC Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) /Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) with the Master of Teaching (MT) offered by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education provide students with a direct pathway to the completion, in 6 years, of their Undergraduate degree, Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications, and Master’s degree. These Combined Degree Programs allow students to complete 1.0 credit in courses that may be counted towards both degrees.

The Combined Degree Programs options are:

  •  Sociology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  •  Sociology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

For more information, including Admission and Program requirements, see the Combined Degree Programs section of the Calendar.

Planning a Program in Sociology

Students are advised to take required courses in the Specialist and Major Programs as early in their careers as possible. For example, SOCA03Y3 should be taken during the first year, SOCB05H3, SOCB35H3SOCB42H3 and SOCB43H3 should be taken during the second year and SOCC40H3 should be taken during the third year. Failure to do so may lead to timetable conflicts and could prolong the completion of the program.

Prerequisites

Students are reminded that they are not permitted to register in courses for which they have not completed the prerequisites indicated in the Calendar. They may only enter a course for which they lack the prerequisites by obtaining permission from the Department of Sociology prior to registration. Ineligible students will be removed from courses.

Applied Writing Skills Courses

Courses designated as Applied Writing Skills Courses develop students' writing skills. Students receive formative feedback on drafts of written work and the opportunity to develop a piece of writing over the term. Specific in-depth feedback on writing is given by the course instructor or course TA. The Applied Writing Skills Courses are: SOCC03H3, SOCC11H3, SOCC23H3, SOCC24H3, SOCC30H3, SOCC31H3, SOCC34H3, SOCC40H3, SOCC47H3 and SOCC58H3.

Research-Intensive Courses

Students interested in careers involving research or in pursuing graduate school or professional programs are strongly advised to take courses that ensure the development of their research skills including the logic of argumentation, research design, and data collection and analysis. In their second year, students should take SOCB05H3 and SOCB35H3. In the third year, two C-level research practicums (SOCC23H3 and SOCC31H3) offer students the opportunity to carry out independent research projects. In their final year, students are encouraged to take research-based courses such as SOCD01H3, SOCD05H3SOCD21H3, SOCD25H3SOCD50H3 and SOCD51H3.

Special Topic Courses

Themes for special topic courses will vary year to year. For more information please visit the Department of Sociology website.

Enrolment Priority

Program students will be given priority access to all Sociology courses.

Sociology Areas of Concentration

Culture and Cities

Criminology and Sociology of Law

Gender and Family

Migration and Ethnicity

Economy, Politics and Society

SOCB44H3
SOCB58H3
SOCC26H3
SOCC27H3
SOCC44H3
 SOCC54H3 
 SOCD01H3 
SOCD51H3

SOCB50H3
SOCB59H3
SOCC03H3
SOCC11H3
SOCC30H3
SOCC45H3
 SOCC46H3 
SOCD05H3

SOCB22H3
SOCB49H3
SOCC09H3
SOCC24H3
SOCC29H3
SOCC38H3
SOCD10H3
SOCD20H3

SOCB53H3
SOCB60H3
SOCC25H3
SOCC34H3
SOCC52H3
SOCC55H3
SOCD15H3
SOCD21H3

SOCB30H3
SOCB37H3
SOCB54H3
SOCB70H3 
 SOCC04H3 
 SOCC15H3 
SOCC57H3
SOCC58H3
SOCC59H3
SOCD25H3

Program Combination Restrictions in Sociology

The Specialist, Major and Minor programs in Sociology cannot be combined; however, students may combine the Specialist in Sociology OR the Major in Sociology with either the Minor in Culture, Creativity and Cities OR the Minor in Critical Migration Studies. Students who combine their Specialist or Major in Sociology with one of the two Minor programs may only count SOCA03Y3 (SOCA01H3 and SOCA02H3) toward both programs. Other Sociology programs cannot be combined.

Experiential Learning and Outreach

For a community-based experiential learning opportunity in your academic field of interest, consider the course CTLB03H3, which can be found in the Teaching and Learning section of the Calendar.

sociology Programs

COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAMS, HONOURS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OR HONOURS BACHELOR OF ARTS / MASTER OF TEACHING

The Combined Degree Programs for UTSC Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc)/ Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) with the Master of Teaching (MT) offered by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are designed for students who are interested in a career in Education. They allow exceptional students who are registered in one of the 50 identified Specialist and Major programs to gain early admission to the MT, which is a full-time professional program that leads to both a Master's degree and eligibility to become a certified teacher in Ontario. Students who successfully complete one of the Combined Degree Programs listed below will earn two University of Toronto degrees (HBA/ HBSc and MT), and be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for a Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers.

Contact Information:
Combined Degree Programs Coordinator
Email: cdp.utsc@utoronto.ca

The Combined Degree Programs options are:

Department of Anthropology

  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Evolutionary Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Socio-Cultural Anthropology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Arts, Culture and Media

  • Theatre and Performance Studies (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Biological Sciences

  • Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Biology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Integrative Biology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Molecular Biology, Immunology and Disease (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Plant Biology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences

  • Mathematics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Mathematics (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of English

  • English (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • English (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Language Studies

  • French (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • French (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Historical and Cultural Studies

  • History (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • History (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Human Geography

  • Human Geography (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Human Geography (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences

  • Medicinal and Biological Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Medicinal and Biological Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Biochemistry (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Biochemistry (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Chemistry (Major Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Global Environmental Change (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Global Environmental Change (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Chemistry (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Chemistry (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Physics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Environmental Physics (Specialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physics and Astrophysics (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physics and Astrophysics (Major), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching
  • Physical and Mathematical Sciences (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Teaching

Department of Sociology

  • Sociology (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching
  • Sociology (Major), Honours Bachelor of Arts/ Master of Teaching

Students applying to the MT must have two teaching subjects regardless of the concentration they are applying to (Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate, or Intermediate/Senior), and must have completed at least 6.0 credits in their first teaching subject and at least 3.0 credits in their second teaching subject (note: both French as a Second Language and Science require at least 6.0 credits in university courses even when they are a second teaching subject). Each of the programs listed below includes a minimum of 6.0 credits in courses that can be applied towards the completion of the prerequisites for the identified OISE teaching subject(s).

UTSC Programs Fit With OISE MT Teaching Subjects:

UTSC Program MT Teaching Subjects - Required Number of Courses/Credits Completed
- Specialist/ Specialist Co-op in Medicinal and Biological Chemistry Science - Chemistry, or
Science - Biology, or
Science - General
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Science - Biology, or
Science - General
- Major/Major Co-op In Biochemistry
- Major in Biology
- Specialist in Conservation and Biodiversity
- Major in Conservation and Biodiversity
- Specialist in Human Biology
- Major in Human Biology
- Specialist in Integrative Biology
- Major in Molecular Biology, Immunology and Disease
- Major in Plant Biology
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Global Environmental Change

Science - Biology

 

- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Chemistry
- Major/Major Co-op in Chemistry
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Environmental Chemistry
Science - Chemistry
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Environmental Physics
- Specialist in Physics and Astrophysics
- Major in Physics and Astrophysics
- Specialist in Physical and Mathematical Sciences
Science - Physics
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in Mathematics
- Major/Major Co-op in Mathematics
Mathematics
- Specialist in Evolutionary Anthropology
- Major in Evolutionary Anthropology
- Specialist in Socio-Cultural Anthropology
- Major in Socio-Cultural Anthropology
- Specialist in Sociology
- Major in Sociology
Social Science - General
- Major in Theatre and Performance Studies Dramatic Arts
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in English
- Major/Major Co-op in English
English
- Specialist/Specialist Co-op in French
- Major/Major Co-op in French
French (Second Language)
- Specialist in History
- Major in History
History
- Specialist in Human Geography
- Major in Human Geography
Geography

Application Process:

  • Applicants must apply to the Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA)/ Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) program, the MT program and the CDP.
  • Qualified students in Year 3 of their HBA/ HBSc degree program apply to the MT program; those accepted will receive a conditional offer to start the MT program upon completion of their HBA/ HBSc program and degree requirements.

Minimum Admission Requirements:

To be considered for conditional admission to the MT program and the selected CDP, applicants must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Be admitted to the HBA/ HBSc degree and at least one of the above-listed undergraduate programs at UTSC.
  • Meet the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies and the MT program.
  • Be enrolled full-time and in good standing in the HBA/ HBSc program(s):
    • have a B+ average or higher in Year 2;
    • carry a full course load of 5.0 credits each year (i.e., complete 5.0 credits over the three academic sessions - Fall, Winter, Summer); where necessary, exceptions will be made for students in Co-op programs.
  • Have completed at least half of the teaching subjects' prerequisite courses - i.e., 3.0 credits in the first teaching subject and at least 1.5 credits in the second teaching subject (or 3.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science) - by the end of Year 3.
  • Provide at least two letters of reference (see: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Home.html).
  • Provide a Statement of Intent indicating their preferred concentration (Primary/Junior, Junior Intermediate, or Intermediate/Senior) and describe three significant teaching and/or teaching-related experiences they have had, especially with groups of children; with reference to these experiences, applicants should identify insights gained about teaching and learning, and explain how, based on these insights, they might contribute to the education of students in today's schools. On their resumé, applicants must list, in chart form, the extent of their teaching experiences; the chart should include dates, location of the experience, applicants' role, and number of hours working with students.
  • Meet other qualifications as specified by the MT program, including: a police record check, relevant teaching experiences, academic and professional references, and satisfying teaching subject prerequisites.

To be given full, unconditional admission to the MT program, applicants must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Maintain a B+ average or higher in their final year of study in the HBA/ HBSc program, or over upper-level (C- and D-level) courses.
  • Achieve at least a B+ average in 1.0 credit in graduate courses taken in Year 4.
  • Regardless of the concentration to which they are applying (Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate, Intermediate/Senior), complete the prerequisites for both the first and second teaching subjects; students are encouraged to consult often with their HBA/HBSc Program Supervisor, as well as the Combined Degree Programs Coordinator.
  • Be conferred with the HBA/ HBSc degree.

Program Requirements and Path to Completion:

  • Year 1 to 4: HBA/ HBSc degree requirements:
    • students must complete all of the HBA/ HBSc program and degree requirements;
    • students are expected to carry a full course load of 5.0 credits over the three academic sessions (Fall, Winter, Summer) of each year;
    • in Year 3, qualified students may apply to the MT and the CDP and may be offered conditional admission to the MT;
    • by the end of Year 3 students must complete at least 3.0 credits required for the first teaching subject, and at least 1.5 credits for the second teaching subject (or 3.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science);
    • in Year 4, students who receive a conditional offer of admission to the CDP must complete any two of the graduate elective half courses recommended by OISE for CDP students; these courses (1.0 credit) are counted towards the completion of both the HBA/ HBSc degree and the MT program and degree; CDP students are graded as graduate students in these courses and are required to meet graduate expectations;
    • by the end of Year 4, students must complete all HBA/ HBSc program requirements and degree requirements, including at least 6.0 credits required for the first teaching subject, and  at least 3.0 credits for the second teaching subject (or 6.0 credits if the second teaching subject is French as a Second Language or Science).
  • Year 5 and 6: Remaining MT program and degree requirements:
    • students must complete 11.0 credits as identified by OISE.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY (ARTS)

Enrolment Requirements
Enrolment in the Specialist program is limited. Students will normally apply to enter the program after completing 4.0 or 5.0 credits including SOCA03Y3. Decisions are made on program admissions only twice a year, in May and in August, and are based on student requests submitted to the Office of the Registrar through ROSI. Admission will require a final grade of 70% or higher in SOCA03Y3 (or a CGPA of 70% or higher in SOCA01H3 and SOCA02H3). For students applying after completing 8.0 to 10.0 credits, admission will be on the basis of SOC courses completed, or on overall CGPA for those students who have not completed any SOC courses. Specialist students will be entitled to priority access to SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCC23H3 and SOCC31H3, for fall-winter sessions, during the summer early registration period.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 12.0 credits as described below. No more than 14.0 credits in Sociology may be included in a four-year degree.

1. 1.0 credit as follows:
[(SOCA01H3) Introduction to Sociology I and (SOCA02H3) Introduction to Sociology II] or
SOCA03Y3 Introduction to Sociology

2. SOCB05H3 Logic of Social Inquiry

3. SOCB35H3 Numeracy and Society

4. SOCB42H3 Theory I: Discovering the Social

5. SOCB43H3 Theory II: Big Ideas in Sociology

6. 3.0 credits at the B-level in Sociology

7. SOCC40H3 Contemporary Sociological Theory

8. SOCC23H3 Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods
or
SOCC31H3 Practicum in Quantitative Research Methods

9. 0.5 credit in SOC at the C-level that has been designated as an Applied Writing Skills course

10. 4.5 additional credits at the C- or D- level in SOC courses*, of which at least 1.0 credit must be at the D-level.
*Students may substitute courses from cognate disciplines with the prior approval of the program supervisor.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY (ARTS)

Enrolment Requirements
Enrolment in the Major program is limited. Students will normally apply to enter the program after completing 4.0 or 5.0 credits including SOCA03Y3. Decisions are made on program admissions only twice a year, in May and in August, and are based on student requests submitted to the Office of the Registrar through ACORN. Admission will require a final grade of 65% or higher in SOCA03Y3 (or a CGPA of 65% or higher in SOCA01H3 and SOCA02H3). For students applying after completing 8.0 to 10.0 credits, admission will be on the basis of SOC courses completed, or on overall CGPA for those students who have not completed any SOC courses. Specialist students will be entitled to priority access to SOCB42H3 and SOCB43H3 for fall-winter sessions, during the summer early registration period.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 7.0 credits in Sociology including:

1. 1.0 credit as follows:
[(SOCA01H3) Introduction to Sociology I and (SOCA02H3) Introduction to Sociology II]
or
SOCA03Y3 Introduction to Sociology

2. SOCB05H3 Logic of Social Inquiry

3. SOCB35H3 Numeracy and Society

4. SOCB42H3 Theory I: Discovering the Social

5. SOCB43H3 Theory II: Big Ideas in Sociology

6. 0.5 credit in SOC courses at the C-level that has been designated as an Applied Writing Skills course

7. 3.5 additional credits in SOC courses, of which at least 1.5 credits must be at the C- or D-level

MINOR PROGRAM IN CRITICAL MIGRATION STUDIES (ARTS)

Program Advisor: Brigitte Gonzalez Shin brigitte.gonzalez@utoronto.ca

The Minor program in Critical Migration Studies offers students an understanding of the causes and consequences of international migration in sending, transit and receiving societies. Issues of race and ethnicity are highlighted along with the role of class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in understanding how societies decide to include, exclude, and regulate different groups of migrants. The Minor is interdisciplinary in content and method; through data-driven coursework and experiential learning, students will develop a suite of transferable skills in research design, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, and written, oral, and digital communication.

Program Restrictions
Students in the Minor Program in Critical Migration Studies may count only 1.0 credit in Sociology courses towards completion of the program from the following list: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3], and SOCB05H3.

Program Requirements
The program requires the completion of 4.0 credits as follows:

1. 1.0 credit from the following:
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language
GASA01H3/​HISA06H3 Introducing Global Asia and its Histories
GASA02H3 Introduction to Global Asia Studies
GGRA02H3 The Geography of Global Processes
HISA04H3 Themes in World History I
HISA05H3 Themes in World History II
HLTA02H3 Foundations in Health Studies I
HLTA03H3 Foundations in Health Studies II
POLA01H3 Critical Issues in Politics I
POLA02H3 Critical Issues in Politics II
[(SOCA01H3) Introduction to Sociology I and (SOCA02H3) Introduction to Sociology II] or SOCA03Y3 Introduction to Sociology]

2. SOCB60H3 Issues in Critical Migration Studies

3. 0.5 credit from the following:
ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
ANTB20H3 Ethnography and the Global Contemporary
GGRB02H3 The Logic of Geographical Thought
HISB03H3 Critical Writing and Research for Historians
HLTB15H3 Introduction to Health Research Methodology
SOCB05H3 Logic of Social Inquiry

4. 0.5 credit from the following:

ANTB16H3 Canadian Cultural Identities
GASB53H3 Mughals and the World, 1500-1858 AD
GASB74H3/​HISB74H3 Asian Foods and Global Cities
GGRA35H3 The Great Scarborough Mashup: People, Place, Community, Experience
SOCB53H3 Race and Ethnicity

5. 1.0 credit from the following:
ANTC34H3 The Anthropology of Transnationalism
CITC01H3 Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East Scarborough
GASC59H3 The Making of Tamil Worlds
GASD01H3/​HISD09H3 Senior Seminar: Topics in Global Asian Migrations
GASD56H3 'Coolies' and Others: Asian Labouring Diasporas in the British Empire
GGRC56H3 Spaces of Travel: Unsettling Migration, Tourism, and Everyday Mobilities
GGRD19H3 Spaces of Multiraciality: Critical Mixed Race Theory
HISB14H3 Edible History: History of Global Foodways
HISC11H3 Multiculturalism and Cultural Identities in the Greek and Roman Worlds
HISC36H3 People in Motion: Immigrants and Migrants in U.S History
HISD31H3 Thinking of Diversity: Perspectives on American Pluralisms
HISD35H3 The Politics of American Immigration, 1865-present
HLTD06H3 Auto-Ethnographic Studies of Migration, Health and the State
POLD52H3 Immigration and Canadian Political Development
SOCC25H3 Ethnicity, Race and Migration
SOCC34H3 Migrations and Transnationalisms
SOCC52H3 Immigration, Citizenship & Settler Colonialism
SOCC55H3 Special Topics in Race and Ethnicity

6. 0.5 credit from the following:
SOCD15H3 Advanced Seminar in Critical Migration Studies
SOCD21H3 Immigrant Scarborough

MINOR PROGRAM IN CULTURE, CREATIVITY, AND CITIES (ARTS)

The Minor Program in Culture, Creativity and Cities offers students an in-depth understanding of the relationship between culture and cities. The Minor is interdisciplinary in content and method. Through experiential learning, students will develop a suite of transferable skills in written, oral, and digital communication.

Program Requirements
The program requires the completion of 4.0 credits as follows:

1. 0.5 credit from the following:
ANTA02H3 Introduction to Anthropology: Society, Culture and Language
CITA01H3/​(CITB02H3) Foundations of City Studies
GGRA02H3 The Geography of Global Processes
MDSA01H3 Introduction to Media Studies
MDSA02H3 History of Media
MGTA01H3 Introduction to Business
MGTA02H3 Managing the Business Organization
[SOCA03Y3 Introduction to Sociology or [(SOCA01H3) Introduction to Sociology I or (SOCA02H3) Introduction to Sociology II]]
VPAA10H3 Introduction to Arts and Media Management

2. SOCB58H3 Sociology of Culture

3. 1.0 credit from the following:
ACMB10H3 Equity and Diversity in the Arts
ENGB37H3 Popular Literature and Mass Culture
GGRB05H3 Urban Geography
GGRB55H3 Cultural Geography
MDSB03H3 Advertising and Consumer Culture
MDSB25H3 Political Economy of Media
SOCB37H3 Economy, Culture, and Society
SOCB44H3 Sociology of Cities and Urban Life

4. SOCC26H3 Sociology of Urban Cultural Policies

5. 1.0 credit from the following:
ENGC59H3 Literature and the Environment
ENGC83H3 World Cinema
GGRC13H3 Urban Political Geography
SOCC27H3 Sociology of Suburbs and Suburbanization
SOCC44H3 Media and Society
SOCC47H3 Creative Industries
SOCD12H3 Sociology of Art
SOCD52H3 Sociology of Books
VPAC15H3 Cultural Policy

6. 0.5 credit from the following:
SOCD01H3 Advanced Seminar in Culture and Cities
SOCD51H3 Capstone Seminar in Culture, Creativity, and Cities

MINOR PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY (ARTS)

Admission to the Minor Program in Sociology is unlimited. However, students are warned that they are not guaranteed admission to B-level and C-level courses during fall and winter session, and thus will be accommodated only after other Program students have been admitted to these courses. Thus some courses may be unavailable, or available only in the summer.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 4.0 credits in Sociology as follows:

1. 1.0 credit as follows:
[(SOCA01H3) Introduction to Sociology I and (SOCA02H3) Introduction to Sociology II]
or
SOCA03Y3 Introduction to Sociology

2. SOCB05H3 Logic of Social Inquiry

3. 1.0 credit from the following:
SOCB30H3 Political Sociology
SOCB42H3 Theory I: Discovering the Social
SOCB43H3 Theory II: Big Ideas in Sociology
SOCB47H3 Social Inequality

4. 0.5 additional credit at the B-level in Sociology

5. 1.0 additional credit at the C-level in Sociology

CERTIFICATE IN COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE

Computational social science extends theories and analyses from the social science by leveraging tools and techniques from scientific computing and data science. The Certificate in computational social science provides students with training in statistics, modeling, and programming approaches to the analysis of social problems using data, and fosters critical thinking and communication skills crucial to social science research.

Certificate Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 credits as follows:

1. 0.5 credit from the following:
SOCB35H3 Numeracy and Society
STAB23H3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences

2. SOCC70H3 Models of the Social World

3. At least 1.0 credit from the following:
CSCA20H3 Introduction to Programming or equivalent
GGRB30H3 Fundamentals of GIS I
GGRB32H3 Fundamentals of GIS II
GGRC30H3 Advanced GIS
GGRC32H3 Essential Spatial Analysis
GGRC42H3 Making Sense of Data: Applied Multivariate Analysis
HLTC27H3 Community Health and Epidemiology
POLD56H3 Politics and Computational Social Science
POLD87H3 Rational Choice and International Cooperation Essential Spatial Analysis

Sociology Courses

SOCA03Y3 - Introduction to Sociology

Sociology focuses on explaining social patterns and how they impact individual lives. This course teaches students how to think sociologically, using empirical research methods and theories to make sense of society. Students will learn about the causes and consequences of inequalities, the ways in which our social worlds are constructed rather than natural, and the role of institutions in shaping our lives. A selection of subfields within the discipline will also be introduced, which may include culture, gender, sexualities, race and ethnicity, education, religion, families, crime, law, health, mass media, social change, and globalization.

Exclusion: (SOC101Y1), (SOCA01H3), (SOCA02H3)
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCB05H3 - Logic of Social Inquiry

This course introduces the logic of sociological research and surveys the major quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Students learn to evaluate the validity of research findings, develop research questions and select appropriate research designs.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] and enrolment in a Sociology program] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor Critical Migration Studies]
Exclusion: SOC150H1, (SOC200H5), (SOC200Y5), SOC221H5, (SOCB40H3), (SOCB41H3)
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCB22H3 - Sociology of Gender

This course examines gender as a sociological category that organizes and, at the same time, is organized by, micro and macro forces. By examining how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age, and other dimensions, we analyze the constitution and evolution of gendered ideology and practice.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] or [WSTA01H3 and WSTA03H3]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB26H3 - Sociology of Education

This course offers a sociological perspective on a familiar experience: attending school. It examines the stated and hidden purposes of schooling; explores how learning in schools is organized; evaluates the drop-out problem; the determinants of educational success and failure; and, it looks at connections between school and work.

Prerequisite: [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB28H3 - Sociological Evidence for Everyday Life

This course will engage evidence-based sociological findings that are often related to how individuals make decisions in everyday life. Special attention will be paid to how empirical findings in sociology are used as evidence in different social contexts and decision making processes. The course should enable students to make direct connections between the insights of sociology and their own lives.

Prerequisite: SOCA03Y3
Enrolment Limits: 120
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB30H3 - Political Sociology

An examination of power in its social context. Specific attention is devoted to how and under what conditions power is exercised, reproduced and transformed, as well as the social relations of domination, oppression, resistance and solidarity. Selected topics may include: nations, states, parties, institutions, citizenship, and social movements.

Prerequisite: [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3
Exclusion: SOC260H1, SOC335H5
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB35H3 - Numeracy and Society

This course introduces the basic concepts and assumptions of quantitative reasoning, with a focus on using modern data science techniques and real-world data to answer key questions in sociology. It examines how numbers, counting, and statistics produce expertise, authority, and the social categories through which we define social reality. This course avoids advanced mathematical concepts and proofs.

Corequisite: [SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]] or enrolment in the Certificate in Computational Social Science.
Enrolment Limits: 150
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

SOCB37H3 - Economy, Culture, and Society

This course offers a sociological account of economic phenomena. The central focus is to examine how economic activities are shaped, facilitated, or even impeded by cultural values and social relations, and show that economic life cannot be fully understood outside of its social context. The course will focus on economic activities of production, consumption, and exchange in a wide range of settings including labor and financial markets, corporations, household and intimate economies, informal and illegal economies, and markets of human goods.

Prerequisite: [SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities]
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCB40H3 - Thinking Like a Sociologist

This course builds on SOCA03Y3 through a deep engagement with 4-5 significant new publications in Sociology, typically books by department faculty and visiting scholars. By developing reading and writing skills through a variety of assignments, and participating in classroom visits with the researchers who produced the publications, students will learn to "think like a sociologist." Possible topics covered include culture, gender, health, immigration/race/ethnicity, political sociology, social networks, theory, sociology of crime and law, and work/stratification/markets.

Prerequisite: SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]
Exclusion: SOC230H5

SOCB42H3 - Theory I: Discovering the Social

This course examines a group of theorists whose work provided key intellectual resources for articulating the basic concepts and tasks of sociology. Central topics include: the consequences of the division of labour, sources and dynamics of class conflict in commercial societies, the social effects of industrial production, the causes and directions of social progress, the foundations of feminism, linkages between belief systems and social structures, and the promises and pathologies of democratic societies.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] and enrolment in a Sociology program
Exclusion: SOC201H1, (SOC203Y1), SOC231H5
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: History, Philosophy and Cultural Studies

SOCB43H3 - Theory II: Big Ideas in Sociology

This course studies a group of writers who in the early 20th century were pivotal in theoretically grounding sociology as a scientific discipline. Central topics include: the types and sources of social authority; the genesis and ethos of capitalism; the moral consequences of the division of labour; the nature of social facts; the origins of collective moral values; the relationship between social theory and social reform; the nature of social problems and the personal experience of being perceived as a social problem; the formal features of association; the social function of conflict; the social and personal consequences of urbanization.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] and SOCB42H3 and enrolment in a Sociology program
Exclusion: (SOC203Y1)
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: History, Philosophy and Cultural Studies

SOCB44H3 - Sociology of Cities and Urban Life

A theoretical and empirical examination of the processes of urbanization and suburbanization. Considers classic and contemporary approaches to the ecology and social organization of the pre-industrial, industrial, corporate and postmodern cities.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities, or the Major/Major Co-op in City Studies]
Exclusion: (SOC205Y1), SOC205H1
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB47H3 - Social Inequality

A sociological examination of the ways in which individuals and groups have been differentiated and ranked historically and cross-culturally. Systems of differentiation and devaluation examined may include gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, citizenship/legal status, and ability/disability.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Major/Major Co-op in Public Policy]
Exclusion: SOC301Y
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience

SOCB49H3 - Sociology of Family

This course explores the family as a social institution, which shapes and at the same time is shaped by, the society in North America. Specific attention will be paid to family patterns in relation to class, gender, and racial/ethnic stratifications. Selected focuses include: socialization; courtship; heterosexual, gay and lesbian relations; gender division of labour; immigrant families; childbearing and childrearing; divorce; domestic violence; elderly care.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] or [WSTA01H3 and WSTA03H3]
Exclusion: SOC214Y
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCB50H3 - Deviance and Normality I

This course explores how deviance and normality is constructed and contested in everyday life. The course revolves around the themes of sexuality, gender, poverty, race and intoxication. Particular attention will be paid to the role of official knowledge in policing social norms.

Prerequisite: [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3
Exclusion: SOC212Y
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB53H3 - Race and Ethnicity

The course draws on a geographically varied set of case studies to consider both the historical development and contemporary state of the sociological field of race, racialization and ethnic relations.

Prerequisite: [[SOCA01H3 and SOCA02H3] or SOCA03Y3] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies]
Exclusion: SOC210Y
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB54H3 - Sociology of Work

Economic activity drives human society. This course explores the nature of work, how it is changing, and the impact of changes on the transition from youth to adult life. It also examines racism in the workplace, female labour force participation, and why we call some jobs 'professions', but not others.

Prerequisite: [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3
Exclusion: SOC207H1, (SOC207Y), SOC227H5
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB58H3 - Sociology of Culture

An introduction to various ways that sociologists think about and study culture. Topics will include the cultural aspects of a wide range of social phenomena - including inequality, gender, economics, religion, and organizations. We will also discuss sociological approaches to studying the production, content, and audiences of the arts and media.

Prerequisite: [[(SOCA01H3 )and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities] or [IDSA01H3 and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Exclusion: SOC220H5, SOC280H1, (SOCC18H3),
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: History, Philosophy and Cultural Studies

SOCB59H3 - Sociology of Law

This course examines the character, authority, and processes of law in contemporary liberal democracies.

Prerequisite: [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCB60H3 - Issues in Critical Migration Studies

What are the causes and consequences of migration in today's world? This course will explore this question in two parts. First, we will examine how although people decide to migrate, they make these decisions under circumstances which are not of their own making. Then, we will focus specifically on the experiences of racialized and immigrant groups in Canada, with a particular focus on the repercussions of Black enslavement and ongoing settler-colonialism. As we explore these questions, we will also critically interrogate the primary response of the Canadian government to questions around racial and class inequality: multiculturalism. What is multiculturalism? Is it enough? Does it make matters worse? Students will come away from this course having critically thought about what types of social change would bring about a freer and more humane society.

Prerequisite: [Completion of 1.0 credit from the following courses: [[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3], ANTA02H3, GGRA02H3, GASA01H3/HISA06H3, GASA02H3, HISA04H3, or HISA05H3] or [any 4.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCB70H3 - Social Change

This course provides an introductory overview of the nature and causes of social change in contemporary societies. Topics covered include: changes in political ideology, cultural values, ethnic and sexual identities, religious affiliation, family formation, health, crime, social structure, and economic inequality.

Prerequisite: [SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]] or [IDSA01H3 and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Enrolment Limits: 150
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC03H3 - Collective Behaviour

The study of uninstitutionalized group behaviour - crowds, panics, crazes, riots and the genesis of social movements.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC04H3 - Social Movements

The development of an approach to social movements which includes the following: the origin of social movements, mobilization processes, the career of the movement and its routinization. The course readings will be closely related to the lectures, and a major concern will be to link the theoretical discussion with the concrete readings of movements.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB22H3 or SOCB49H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC09H3 - Sociology of Gender and Work

Explores the interaction of gender and work, both paid and unpaid work. Critically assesses some cases for central theoretical debates and recent research. Considers gender differences in occupational and income attainment, housework, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, and the construction of gender identity through occupational roles.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [8.0 credits, including WSTB05H3 and enrolment in the Major program in Women's and Gender Studies]
Exclusion: SOC362H5
Recommended Preparation: SOCB22H3 or SOCB49H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC11H3 - Policing and Security

This course examines the character of policing and security programs in advanced liberal democracies. Attention will be paid to the nature and enforcement of modern law by both state and private agents of order, as well as the dynamics of the institutions of the criminal justice system. This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Exclusion: (SOC306Y1), SOC326H5
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC15H3 - Work, Employment and Society

An upper level course that examines a number of critical issues and important themes in the sociological study of work. Topics covered will include: the changing nature and organization of work, precarious employment, different forms of worker organizing and mobilization, the professions, the transition from school to work.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB54H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC23H3 - Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods

How do people navigate their everyday lives? Why do they do what they do? And how, as sociologists, can we draw meaningful conclusions about these processes and the larger, social world we live in? Qualitative research methods adhere to the interpretative paradigm. Sociologists use them to gain a richer understanding of the relationship between the minutiae of everyday life and larger societal patterns. This course will introduce students to the qualitative methods that social scientists rely on, while also providing them with hands-on experience carrying out their own research.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits including [[[(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] and SOCB05H3] and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.3
Exclusion: (SOCD23H3)
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC24H3 - Special Topics in Gender and Family

A theoretical and empirical examination of different forms of family and gender relations. Of special interest is the way in which the institution of the family produces and reflects gendered inequalities in society. Themes covered include changes and continuities in family and gender relations, micro-level dynamics and macro-level trends in family and gender, as well as the interplay of structure and agency.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [8.0 credits, including WSTB05H3 and enrolment in the Major program in Women's and Gender Studies]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB22H3 or SOCB49H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC25H3 - Ethnicity, Race and Migration

Why do people migrate and how do they decide where to go? How does a society determine which border crossers are ‘illegal’ and which are ‘legal’? Why are some people deemed ‘refugees’ while others are not? What consequences do labels like ‘deportee’, ‘immigrant,’ ‘refugee,’ or ‘trafficking victim’ have on the people who get assigned them? This course will examine these and other similar questions. We will explore how the politics of race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship shape the ways that states make sense of and regulate different groups of migrants as well as how these regulatory processes affect im/migrants’ life opportunities.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB60H3 and an additional 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor program in Critical Migration Studies] or [IDSB07H3 and an additional 8.0 credits, and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op Program in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB22H3 or SOCB49H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC26H3 - Sociology of Urban Cultural Policies

A popular civic strategy in transforming post-industrial cities has been the deployment of culture and the arts as tools for urban regeneration. In this course, we analyze culture-led development both as political economy and as policy discourse. Topics include the creative city; spectacular consumption spaces; the re-use of historic buildings; cultural clustering and gentrification; eventful cities; and urban 'scenes'.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities] or [ CITA01H3/(CITB02H3) and enrolment in the Major/Major Co-op in City Studies]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB44H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC27H3 - Sociology of Suburbs and Suburbanization

This course examines the political economy of suburban development, the myth and reality of suburbanism as a way of life, the working class suburb, the increasing diversity of suburban communities, suburbia and social exclusion, and the growth of contemporary suburban forms such as gated communities and lifestyle shopping malls.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities] or [CITA01H3/(CITB02H3) and enrolment in the Major/Major Co-op in City Studies]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB22H3 or SOCB49H3
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC29H3 - Family and Gender in the Middle East

In this course, students read and evaluate recent research related to the sociology of families and gender in the modern Middle East. The course explores the diversity of family forms and processes across time and space in this region, where kinship structures have in the past been characterized as static and uniformly patriarchal. Topics covered include marriage, the life course, family nucleation, the work-family nexus, divorce, family violence, and masculinities.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [8.0 credits, including WSTB05H3, and enrolment in the Major Program in Women's and Gender Studies] or [8.0 credits, including ASFB01H3, and enrolment in the Minor Program in African Studies] or [IDSA01H3 and additional 8.0 credits, and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op Program in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC30H3 - Criminal Behaviour

The young figure prominently in people's views about, and fears of, crime. This course examines definitions of crime, how crime problems are constructed and measured. It looks at schools and the street as sites of criminal behaviour, and considers how we often react to crime in the form of moral panics.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC31H3 - Practicum in Quantitative Research Methods

This course provides students with hands-on experience conducting quantitative research. Each student will design and carry out a research project using secondary data. Students will select their own research questions, review the relevant sociological literature, develop a research design, conduct statistical analyses and write up and present their findings.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits, including [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)] or SOCA03Y3] and SOCB05H3 and [SOCB35H3 or (SOCB06H3)]] and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.3
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Quantitative Reasoning
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC34H3 - Migrations & Transnationalisms

Examines the relationship between contemporary modes of international migration and the formation of transnational social relations and social formations. Considers the impact of trans-nationalisms on families, communities, nation-states, etc.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, IDSB01H3]] or [SOCB60H3 and an additional 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies] or [IDSA01H3 and an additional 8.0 credits, and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op Program in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC37H3 - Environment and Society

This course links studies in the classical sociology of resources and territory (as in the works of Harold Innis, S.D. Clark, and the Chicago School), with modern topics in ecology and environmentalism. The course will use empirical research and theoretical issues to explore the relationship between various social systems and their natural environments.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [any 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Major/Major Co-op in Public Policy] or [any 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Major Program in Environmental Studies or the Certificate in Sustainability]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC38H3 - Gender and Education

An examination of a number of key issues in the sociology of education, focusing particularly upon gender and higher education.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [8.0 credits, including WSTB05H3 and enrolment in the Major in Women's and Gender Studies]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC40H3 - Contemporary Sociological Theory

This course surveys key topics in contemporary sociological theory. The development of sociological theory from the end of World War II to the late 1960's. Special attention is devoted to the perspectives of Functionalism, Conflict Theory and Symbolic Interactionism.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Exclusion: (SOCC05Y3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC44H3 - Media and Society

Provides an introduction to the emergence, organization and regulation of various media forms; social determinants and effects of media content; responses of media audiences; and other contemporary media issues.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities] or [IDSA01H3 and an additional 8.0 credits, and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Exclusion: (SOCB56H3), (SOCB57H3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC45H3 - Youth and Society

This course examines youth as a social category, and how young people experience and shape societies. Topics include: youth and social inequality; social change and social movements, and youth and education.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC46H3 - Special Topics in Sociology of Law

The course covers various approaches to the study of law in society. Topics covered may include the interaction between law, legal, non-legal institutions and social factors, the social development of legal institutions, forms of social control, legal regulation, the interaction between legal cultures, the social construction of legal issues, legal profession, and the relation between law and social change.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC47H3 - Creative Industries

An introduction to organizational and economic sociology through the lens of creative industries. Students will be introduced to different theoretical paradigms in the study of organizations, industries, and fields. The course is divided into four major modules on creative industries: inequality and occupational careers; organizational structure and decision making under conditions of uncertainty; market and field-level effects; and distribution and promotion.
This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [8.0 credits including SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology and the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities.

SOCC49H3 - Indigenous Health

This course will examine the healh and well-being of Indigenous peoples, given historic and contemporary issues. A critical examination of the social determinants of health, including the cultural, socioeconomic and political landscape, as well as the legacy of colonialism, will be emphasized. An overview of methodologies and ethical issues working with Indigenous communities in health research and developing programs and policies will be provided. The focus will be on the Canadian context, but students will be exposed to the issues of Indigenous peoples worldwide.

Same as HLTC49H3

Prerequisite: HLTB41H3 or [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3 , SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]]
Exclusion: HLTC49H3
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC50H3 - Sociology of Religion

This course explores the social meaning and influence of religion in social life. As a set of beliefs, symbols and motivations, as well as a structural system, religion is multifaceted and organizes many aspects of our daily life. This course surveys key theoretical paradigms on the meaning of religion and the social implications of religious transformations across time. It takes up basic questions about how religion is shaped by various political, social, and economic forces.

Prerequisite: SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist, Major and Minor programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCC51H3 - Special Topics in Health and Society

An examination of a current topic relevant to the study of health and society. The specific topic will vary from year to year.

 

Same as HLTC51H3

Prerequisite: HLTB41H3 or [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 from SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]]
Exclusion: HLTC51H3
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology.

SOCC52H3 - Immigration, Citizenship and Settler Colonialism

The course examines the relationship between the displacement and dispossession of Indigenous peoples and immigration in settler-colonial states. The focus is on Canada as a traditional country of immigration. Topics considered include historical and contemporary immigration and settlement processes, precarious forms of citizenship and noncitizenship, racism and racial exclusion, and the politics of treaty citizenship. Discussion puts the Canadian case in comparative perspective.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB60H3 and an additional 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor Program in Critical Migration Studies]
Exclusion: (SOCB52H3) and SOC210Y
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC54H3 - Special Topics in Sociology of Culture

Sociological analysis of the role of culture in societies is offered under this course. Topics may include the study of material cultures such as works of art, religious symbols, or styles of clothing, or non-material cultures such as the values, norms, rituals, and beliefs that orient action and social life.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Please see the Sociology Department website at http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~socsci/ for a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters.

SOCC55H3 - Special Topics in Race and Ethnicity

This course addresses key concepts and debates in the research on race and ethnicity. Topics covered may include historical and global approaches to: assimilation, ethnic relations, intersectionality, racialization, and scientific racism.

Prerequisite: [[SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB60H3 and an additional 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Please see the Sociology Department website at http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~socsci/ for a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters.

SOCC57H3 - Gender, Race, and Class in Economic Life

This course examines how the three-axis of social stratification and inequality – race, gender, and class – shape economic activity in different settings – from labour markets to financial markets to consumer markets to dating markets to household economies to intimate economies to informal and illegal economies to markets of human goods.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCC58H3 - Global Transformations: Politics, Economy and Society

A sociological examination of contemporary global transformations including changing social, economic, and political conditions. Topics examined may include the shifting nature of state-society relations in a global context; the emergence of globally-integrated production, trade and financial systems; and the dynamics of local and transnational movements for global social change.
This course has been designated as a Writing Skills course.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [IDSA01H3 and an additional 8.0 credits and enrolment in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op Program in International Development Studies (Arts)]
Exclusion: SOC236H5
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCC59H3 - Special Topics in Social Inequality

Sociological analyses of stratification processes and the production of social inequality with a focus on economy and politics. Topics covered may include work and labour markets, the state and political processes. Attention is given to grassroots mobilization, social movements, and contestatory politics.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: See the Sociology Department website for a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters.

SOCC61H3 - The Sociology of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is an historic process that now directs a core area of Canadian politics and governance. This course examines the institutional and legal history, precedents, contradictions and consequences of the commission from a sociological perspective.

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 or SOCB35H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience

SOCC70H3 - Models of the Social World

This course examines how quantitative models can be used to understand the social world with a focus on social inequality and social change. Students will learn the fundamentals of modern computational techniques and data analysis, including how to effectively communicate findings using narratives and visualizations. Topics covered include data wrangling, graphic design, regression analysis, interactive modelling, and categorical data analysis. Methods will be taught using real-world examples in sociology with an emphasis on understanding key concepts rather than mathematical formulas.

Prerequisite: SOCB35H3 or [completion of 8.0 credits, including component 1 of the course requirements for the Certificate in Computational Social Science]
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCD01H3 - Advanced Seminar in Culture and Cities

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Culture and Cities. Check the department website for more details. This course has been designated a Research Skills Course

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB44H3, SOCB47H3, SOCB58H3]] or [10.0 credits including SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology, and the Minor program in Culture, Creativity, and Cities.

SOCD02H3 - Global Field School: Indigenous Costa Rica

The intensive international field school course is an experiential and land-based learning trip to Indigenous territories in Costa Rica, in order to learn about settler colonialism, Indigenous communities, and UNDRIP (the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples). Students will learn with Indigenous Costa Rican university students and community partners in order to draw links between policy frameworks (UNDRIP), ideologies (colonialism) and the impacts on Indigenous communities (e.g. education, health, food security, language retention, land rights). The course involves 14-16 days of in-country travel. This course has been designated as a Research Skills course.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits, including SOCC61H3] and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, or SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Major or Specialist Programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits. This course requires students to register and fill out an application form. To request a SOCD02H3 course application form, please contact sociologyadvisor.utsc@utoronto.ca. This form is due one week after students enroll in the course.
Enrolment Control: A
Restricted to students in the sociology programs.
Step 1: Request the course on ACORN. Your status will be INT. You will not be officially enrolled until you complete the remaining steps (below).
Step 2: Request an application form from the program advisor at sociologyadvisor.utsc@utoronto.ca Step 3: Submit the application form by email to the program advisor at sociologyadvisor.utsc@utoronto.ca
If you are approved for enrolment the department will arrange to have your course status on ACORN changed from interim (INT) to approved (APP).  P = Priority, R = Restricted, A = Approval , E = Enrolment on ACORN is disabled

SOCD05H3 - Advanced Seminar in Criminology and Sociology of Law

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Criminology and Sociology of Law. Check the department website for more details. This course has been designated a Research Skills Course

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: [SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, SOCB50H3, (SOCB51H3)]
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD08H3 - Scarborough Place-Making: Indigenous Sovereignty and Settler Landholding

This course charts the legal norms and social relations that, from the 1700s to the present, have turned land into a place and an idea called Scarborough. Students work with a diversity of sources and artifacts such as crown patents, government reports and Indigenous legal challenges, historical and contemporary maps and land surveys, family letters, historical plaques, and Indigenous artists’ original works to trace the conflicts and dialogues between Indigenous and settler place-making in Scarborough. This course has been designated a Research Skills Course.

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits, including SOCB05H3 and 1.0 credit from the following: [SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3] or one from the following: [POLC56H3, POLC52H3, GGRB18H3, POLD54H3]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist, Major and Minor programs in Sociology, including the Critical Migration Studies Minor. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD10H3 - Advanced Seminar in Gender and Family

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Gender and Family. Check the department website for details at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/programs.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3 or SOCB42H3 or SOCB43H3 or SOCB47H3 or (SOCC39H3)]] or [8.0 credits [including WSTB05H3] and enrolment in the Major in Women's and Gender Studies]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology, and Major in Women's and Gender Studies. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD11H3 - Program and Policy Evaluation

This course provides an introduction to the field of program and policy evaluation. Evaluation plays an important role in evidence based decision making in all aspects of society. Students will gain insight into the theoretical, methodological, practical, and ethical aspects of evaluation across different settings. The relative strengths and weaknesses of various designs used in applied social research to examine programs and policies will be covered.


Same as HLTD11H3

Prerequisite: [[STAB22H3 or STAB23H3] and [0.5 credit from HLTC42H3, HLTC43H3, HLTC44H3] and [an additional 1.0 credit at the C-level in HLT courses from one of the Major/Major Co-op programs in Health Studies]] or [10.0 credits and [SOCB05H3 and SOCB35H3] and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]]
Exclusion: HLTD11H3
Enrolment Limits: 10
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience

SOCD12H3 - Sociology of Art

An examination of sociological approaches to the study of visual art. Topics include the social arrangements and institutional processes involved in producing, consecrating, distributing, and marketing art as well as artistic consumption practices.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits including: SOCB05H3, and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB58H3, SOCC44H3, or SOCC47H3] and [0.5 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, or SOCB44H3]] or [any 10.0 credits including: SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor program in Culture, Creativity and Cities].
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences

SOCD13H3 - Sociology of Finance

This is an advanced course on the sub-filed of economic sociology that focuses on money and finance. This course examines how cultural values and social relations shape money and finance in a variety of substantive settings, including the historical emergence of money as currency, the expansion of the financial system since the 1980s, financial markets, growing household involvement in the stock and credit market, and implications for social life (e.g., how credit scores shape dating).

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, SOCB50H3, or (SOCB51H3)]
Recommended Preparation: SOCB35H3 and SOCB37H3
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist, Major, and Minor programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD15H3 - Advanced Seminar in Critical Migration Studies

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Migration Studies. Students will be required to conduct independent research based on primary and/or secondary data sources. Check the department website for details at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/programs.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]] or [SOCB60H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies] or [10.0 credits including IDSB11H3 and enrolment in the Certificate in Global Development, Environment and Health]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given first to students enrolled in the Minor in Critical Migration Studies, then to students in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD20H3 - Advanced Seminar: Social Change and Gender Relations in Chinese Societies

This seminar examines the transformation and perpetuation of gender relations in contemporary Chinese societies. It pays specific attention to gender politics at the micro level and structural changes at the macro level through in-depth readings and research.
Same as GASD20H3

Prerequisite: [SOCB05H3 and 0.5 credit in SOC course at the C-level] or [GASA01H3 and GASA02H3 and 0.5 credit at the C-level from the options in requirement #2 of the Specialist or Major programs in Global Asia Studies] or [10.0 credits including IDSB11H3 and enrolment in the Certificate in Global Development, Environment and Health]
Exclusion: GASD20H3
Recommended Preparation: GASB20H3 and GASC20H3
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCD21H3 - Immigrant Scarborough

This course will teach students how to conduct in-depth, community-based research on the social, political, cultural and economic lives of immigrants. Students will learn how to conduct qualitative research including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Students will also gain valuable experience linking hands-on research to theoretical debates about migration, transnationalism and multicultural communities. Check the Department of Sociology website for more details.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, (SOCC39H3)]] or [SOCB60H3 and enrolment in the Minor Program in Critical Migration Studies] or [11.0 credits, including ASFB01H3, and enrolment in the Minor Program in African Studies]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: For a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters check the Department's website at http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/

SOCD25H3 - Advanced Seminar in Economy, Politics and Society

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Economy, Politics and Society. Check the department website for more details. This course has been designated a Research Skills Course

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD30Y3 - Special Topics in Community-Engaged Research

This course is taught over two full terms. It offers an in-depth exploration of significant topics in community-based research including ethics, research design, collaborative data analysis and research relevance and dissemination. Students conduct independent community-engaged research with important experiential knowledge components. Check the Department of Sociology website for more details.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3 or SOCB42H3 or SOCB43H3 or SOCB47H3 or (SOCC39H3)]] or [SOCB60H3 and enrolment in the Minor Program in Critical Migration Studies]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD32Y3 - Special Topics in the Practice of Research

This course is taught over two full terms. It offers students an opportunity to conduct research on an original research topic or as part of an ongoing faculty research project. Students will develop a research proposal, conduct independent research, analyze data and present findings. Check the Department of Sociology website for more details.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits, including (SOCB05H3) and (SOCB35H3)] and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD40H3 - Supervised Independent Research

Independent research using field methods, survey analysis, library or archival research; regular supervision of data collection and analysis; final written research report. Intended for upper level students with well above average performance in sociology and whose interests or needs are not met by other sociology courses being offered.

Prerequisite: 15.0 credits, including: [[SOCA03Y3 or (SOCA01H3)] and (SOCA02H3)] and [SOCB35H3 or (SOCB06H3)] and [SOCB05H3 or [(SOCB40H3) and (SOCB41H3)]] and SOCB42H3 and SOCB43H3 and permission of the instructor and the Sociology Supervisor of Studies
Exclusion: SOC390Y and SOC391H and SOC392H
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCD41H3 - Supervised Independent Research

Independent research using field methods, survey analysis, library or archival research; regular supervision of data collection and analysis; final written research report. Intended for upper level students with well above average performance in sociology and whose interests or needs are not met by other sociology courses being offered.

Prerequisite: 15.0 credits, including [SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]] and [SOCB35H3 or (SOCB06H3)] and [SOCB05H3 or [(SOCB40H3) and (SOCB41H3)]] and SOCB42H3 and SOCB43H3 and permission of the instructor and the Sociology Supervisor of Studies.
Exclusion: SOC390Y, SOC391H, SOC392H
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCD42H3 - Advanced Seminar in Sociological Theory

This course offers an in depth exploration of significant topics in contemporary and/or sociological theory. Check the department website for details at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/programs.

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Note: For a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters check the Department's website at http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/

SOCD44H3 - Advanced Seminar on Issues in Contemporary Sociology

Exploration of current debates and controversies surrounding recent scholarly developments in Sociology. Check the department website for details at: https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/special-topics-advanced-seminars

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3]
Note: For a listing of the course topics for current and upcoming semesters check the Department's website at http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/

SOCD50H3 - Research Seminar: Realizing the Sociological Imagination

This course presents students with the opportunity to integrate and apply their sociological knowledge and skills through conducting independent research. In a step-by-step process, each student will design and conduct an original research study. The course is especially suited for those students interested in pursuing graduate studies or professional careers involving research skills.

Prerequisite: 12.0 credits, including [SOCA03Y3 or [(SOCA01H3) and (SOCA02H3)]] and SOCB05H3 and [SOCB35H3 or (SOCB06H3)] and [SOCC23H3 or SOCC31H3] and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.7
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience

SOCD51H3 - Capstone Seminar in Culture, Creativity, and Cities

This course provides a hands-on learning experience with data collection, analysis, and dissemination on topics discussed in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities. It involves substantial group and individual-based learning, and may cover topics as diverse as the role of cultural fairs and festivals in the city of Toronto, the efficacy of arts organizations, current trends in local cultural labour markets, artistic markets inside and outside of the downtown core, food culture, and analysis of governmental datasets on arts participation in the city.

Prerequisite: [10.0 credits and SOCB05H3 and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB44H3, SOCB47H3, SOCB58H3]] or [10.0 credits including SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor Program in Culture, Creativity and Cities]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities followed by Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

SOCD52H3 - Sociology of Books

A sociological examination of the creation, production, dissemination, and reception of books.

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits including SOCB05H3, and [1.0 credit from the following: SOCB30H3, SOCB42H3, SOCB43H3, SOCB47H3, SOCB44H3, SOCB58H3] or [10.0 credits including SOCB58H3 and enrolment in the Minor in Culture, Creativity and Cities]
Exclusion: [SOCD44H3 if taken in 2014-2015 or 2015-2016 or 2016-2017]
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirements: Social and Behavioural Sciences
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Note: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities followed by Specialist and Major programs in Sociology. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

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